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High efficacy how to get cialis over the counter of high dose intravenous ceftriaxone against extragenital gonorrhoeaCeftriaxone monotherapy is well established for treating Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) urethritis, but data are limited for pharyngeal and rectal s. This prospective single-centre study was conducted in Japan in 2017–2020 among HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM) who underwent routine STI screening, including nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) for rectal and pharyngeal NG every 3 months.1 Among 320 how to get cialis over the counter cases of extragenital gonorrhoea (all asymptomatic), 208 received only ceftriaxone (single 1 g intravenous dose) and 112 received additional treatment with doxycycline (100 mg two times a day for 7 days) or azithromycin (single 1 g dose) for concomitant STIs (predominantly, Chlamydia trachomatis (CT)). There was no difference in NG cure rates between the two groups (98.1% vs 95.5%) or by site. Data are needed for other ceftriaxone dosing strategies and in areas where ceftriaxone resistance is how to get cialis over the counter a major concern.Published in STI—The Editor’s Choice.

Neisseria gonorrhoeae is associated with poor pregnancy and birth outcomesThis systematic review and meta-analysis compiled data from 30 studies that reported NG testing how to get cialis over the counter during pregnancy and compared pregnancy and birth outcomes between women with and without NG.2 Results indicated that NG s during pregnancy nearly doubled the risk of preterm birth (summary adjusted OR 1.90. 95% CI 1.14 to 3.19). The effect was more pronounced in low-income and middle-income countries than how to get cialis over the counter in high-income countries. Additionally, results suggested that NG may be associated with premature rupture of membranes, perinatal mortality, low birth how to get cialis over the counter weight and ophthalmia neonatorum, although estimates in most studies did not sufficiently control for confounders.

The findings identify NG s as risk factor for poor pregnancy outcomes.Inadvertent HPV vaccination during or peripregnancy is not associated with adverse outcomesHuman papillomacialis (HPV) vaccination is not recommended in pregnancy due to lack of safety data. However, a pregnancy test how to get cialis over the counter is not required prior to vaccination. This multisite cohort study collated data from 445 women who received the nonavalent HPV treatment during pregnancy and 496 that received the treatment peripregnancy (within 42 days before last menstrual period (LMP)).3 Pregnancy and neonatal outcomes in these groups were compared with those of 552 distal (16–22 weeks pre-LMP) exposures to the quadrivalent or nonavalent HPV treatment. Compared with distal-exposures, during-pregnancy or peripregnancy, exposures were not associated with spontaneous abortion, preterm birth or how to get cialis over the counter small-for-gestational-age births.

Birth defects were how to get cialis over the counter rare in all groups. The findings inform counselling for women who inadvertently receive the nonavalent (and possibly quadrivalent) HPV treatment during pregnancy. Data are needed for the bivalent HPV treatment.Has the time how to get cialis over the counter come for point-of-care STI testing?. Point-of-care (POC) STI testing has been proposed as a strategy to both improve treatment rates and optimise how to get cialis over the counter antibiotic stewardship.

This study investigated the performance of the Visby Medical Sexual Health Test, a POC PCR-based NAAT for rapid (30 m) detection of CT, NG and Trichomonas vaginalis (TV).4 The analysis used self-collected vaginal samples from 1535 women who attended 10 clinics in seven US states over an 11-month period. Results were compared with those how to get cialis over the counter of clinician-collected samples tested using gold-standard laboratory-based NAATs. Specificity and sensitivity of the POC test were 98.3% and 97.4% for CT, 97.4% and 99.4% for NG and 99.2% and 96.9% for TV. These results highlight the potential utility of easy-to-use POC NAATs in clinical practice.Point of care HIV-1 RNA testing facilitates the same-day confirmation of HIV and leads to rapid viral suppression when followed by immediate antiretroviral treatmentMSM with primary HIV (PHI) and those with established but undiagnosed can be an important how to get cialis over the counter source of onward transmission.

This study from Amsterdam evaluated a how to get cialis over the counter strategy comprising. (i) an online media campaign to increase awareness about PHI among MSM and promote self-referral for testing, (ii) qualitative POC HIV-1 RNA testing for same-day confirmation of and delivery of results and (iii) immediate referral of newly diagnosed men to a treatment centre to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART within 24 hours.5 Time to viral suppression was only 55 days for MSM who benefitted from the strategy and shorter than previous strategies that deferred ART initiation and/or did not employ HIV-1 RNA POC testing. The approach proved feasible in Amsterdam and should be investigated in other settings.Pre-exposure prophylaxis, HIV incidence and risk behaviour among MSM in West AfricaThis prospective cohort study investigated the use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) among MSM in Côte D’Ivoire, Mali, Togo and Burkina Faso as an extension of CohMSM, how to get cialis over the counter a prevention study that did not include PrEP.6 Participants were free to choose between daily or event-driven PrEP, change between the two and stop and restart PrEP. Among 598 MSM how to get cialis over the counter followed for 743.6 person years, HIV incidence was 2.3 per 100 person-years (95% CI 1.3 to 3.7) and lower than in CohMSM (adjusted incidence rate ratio 0.21.

95% CI 0.12 to 0.36). There was no evidence of an increase in risk behaviour since how to get cialis over the counter reports of condomless anal sex and prevalence of STIs remained stable, whereas the number of male sexual partners and of sex acts with casual male partners decreased. PrEP is an effective prevention tool for MSM in West Africa.Ethics statementsPatient consent for publicationNot required..

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This is a good viagra and cialis news, and this increasingly strong job growth shows that we’re moving in the right direction. Even the slight increase in the unemployment rate is a promising sign – it indicates people are looking for work again after the cialis. Here are five numbers that help explain the current state of the American viagra and cialis job market. 567,000 Over the past three months, we've added an average of about 567,000 jobs to the economy.

This is great news but we still have a steep climb ahead to reach a full viagra and cialis and inclusive recovery. 9.2% Despite significant job gains, many workers still face high levels of unemployment – especially workers of color. The unemployment rate is 5.2 % for white workers and 5.8% for Asian workers, but it’s significantly higher for Black and Hispanic workers, at 9.2% and 7.4%, respectively. We don’t want to return to the long-standing trend of elevated unemployment viagra and cialis rates for Black and Brown workers.

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To find out how to re-apply for a MDEL, please refer to our Guidance on medical device establishment licensing (GUI-0016). In line with the Compliance viagra and cialis and Enforcement Policy (POL-0001), Health Canada monitors activities for compliance. If your MDEL has been cancelled, you may be subject to compliance and enforcement actions if you conduct non-compliant activities. If you have questions about a MDEL or the application process, please contact the viagra and cialis Medical Device Establishment Licensing Unit at hc.mdel.questions.leim.sc@canada.ca.

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We’ve added how to get cialis over the counter how to get prescribed cialis more than 3 million jobs to our economy since President Biden took office. Today, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the American economy added 850,000 jobs in the month of June, and the unemployment rate was 5.9 percent, compared to 5.8 percent in May. This increasingly strong job growth reflects growing confidence among workers as more people get vaccinated and American Rescue Plan investments provide stability for families, businesses, how to get cialis over the counter and communities. Americans are going back to work in large numbers, but this is no time to let up. I’ve seen our progress first-hand as I've traveled how to get cialis over the counter around the nation.

As erectile dysfunction treatment cases decline, worker confidence is growing. But there’s a long road to recovery ahead. We're still down millions of jobs from pre-cialis levels how to get cialis over the counter and the inequities heightened by the crisis persist. We need to be proactive in our policies to create good jobs and make sure all workers have access to those jobs. As we enter the Fourth of how to get cialis over the counter July weekend, there is cause for celebration.

This Independence Day, more of us can gather safely with friends and family again, confident that we are beating the cialis, jobs are returning, and that under the President’s leadership the economy is growing faster than at any time in the past 40 years. The Biden-Harris administration is delivering on their promise to #buildbackbetter.The economy added 850,000 jobs in June, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported this morning, and the unemployment rate was 5.9%, little changed from 5.8% in May. This is a good news, and this increasingly strong job growth shows that how to get cialis over the counter we’re moving in the right direction. Even the slight increase in the unemployment rate is a promising sign – it indicates people are looking for work again after the cialis. Here are five numbers that help explain the current state how to get cialis over the counter of the American job market.

567,000 Over the past three months, we've added an average of about 567,000 jobs to the economy. This is great news but we still have a steep climb ahead to reach a full and how to get cialis over the counter inclusive recovery. 9.2% Despite significant job gains, many workers still face high levels of unemployment – especially workers of color. The unemployment rate is 5.2 % for white workers and 5.8% for Asian workers, but it’s significantly higher for Black and Hispanic workers, at 9.2% and 7.4%, respectively. We don’t want how to get cialis over the counter to return to the long-standing trend of elevated unemployment rates for Black and Brown workers.

As we invest in America’s workforce, we must also work to address to longstanding and persistent systemic inequities. 9.8% The how to get cialis over the counter headline unemployment rate is just one measure of economic hardship. When we add up the number of people unemployed plus those are marginally attached to the labor force, (aka they aren’t working or looking for work but want a job) plus those who are employed part-time for economic reasons, we identify the broadest measure of how workers are faring in the economy, which is referred to as U-6. This month the percentage of people in this category fell to 9.8% – the first time it’s been below 10% since the cialis began. This is good news because often these groups are the last to feel how to get cialis over the counter the effects of recovery.

1.4% Workers are seeing strong growth in their wages, with an increase of 1.4% in average hourly earnings over the past three months. This is the biggest how to get cialis over the counter three-month increase we’ve seen during any pre-cialis period since 2006. This is great news for workers, especially those who have suffered stagnant wages for years. 0.4% The cialis took a disproportionate toll on working women, with how to get cialis over the counter more than 2 million leaving the workforce in 2020. Though we have a lot more work to do to create an economy that adequately supports and compensates working women, this month’s report did include some good news.

The labor force participation rate for prime-aged women (25-54) increased by 0.4 percentage points. The encouraging numbers in this month’s jobs report reflects growing confidence among workers as more people get vaccinated, erectile dysfunction treatment cases keep declining, and American Rescue Plan investments continue to provide stability for families, how to get cialis over the counter businesses, and communities. We have made historic progress, but we still have more work to do. My colleagues how to get cialis over the counter at the Labor Department are working hard to empower and protect workers and ensure that the post-cialis economy is inclusive, equitable and growing. Janelle Jones is the chief economist of the U.S.

Department of Labor.MDEL Bulletin, June 24 2021, from the Medical Devices Compliance Program On this page Fees for Medical Device Establishment Licences (MDELs) We issue Medical Device Establishment Licences (MDELs) to. class I manufacturers importers or distributors of all device classes for human use in Canada The MDEL fee is a flat fee, regardless of when we how to get cialis over the counter receive your initial application. The same fee applies to applications for. a new MDEL the reinstatement of a suspended MDEL the annual licence review (ALR) of an MDEL how to get cialis over the counter If you submit any of these applications, you must pay the MDEL fee when you receive an invoice. See Part 3, Division 2 of the Fees in Respect of Drugs and Medical Devices Order.

Normally, we collect the MDEL fee before we review an application. However, to help meet how to get cialis over the counter the demand for medical devices during the erectile dysfunction treatment cialis, we have been reviewing and processing MDEL applications before collecting the fees. As a result, some MDEL holders still haven't paid the fees for their 2020 initial MDEL application, despite multiple reminders. Authority to withhold services in case of non-payment As stated in the Food and Drug Act, Health Canada has the authority to withhold services, approvals, rights and/or privileges, if the fee for an MDEL application how to get cialis over the counter is not paid. Non-payment of fees 30.64.

The Minister may withdraw or withhold a service, the use of a facility, a regulatory process or approval or a product, right how to get cialis over the counter or privilege under this Act from any person who fails to pay the fee fixed for it under subsection 30.61(1). For more information, please refer to. Cancellation of existing MDELs We will cancel MDELs for existing MDEL holders with outstanding fees for. initial applications or annual licence how to get cialis over the counter review applications If your establishment licence is cancelled, you are no longer authorized to conduct licensable activities (such as manufacturing, distributing or importing medical devices). You must stop licensable activities as soon as you receive your cancellation notice.

Resuming activities after MDEL cancellation To resume licensable activities, you must re-apply for how to get cialis over the counter a new establishment licence and pay the MDEL fee. See section 45 of the Medical Device Regulations. To find out how to re-apply for a MDEL, please refer to our Guidance on medical device establishment licensing (GUI-0016). In line with the Compliance and Enforcement Policy how to get cialis over the counter (POL-0001), Health Canada monitors activities for compliance. If your MDEL has been cancelled, you may be subject to compliance and enforcement actions if you conduct non-compliant activities.

If you have questions about how to get cialis over the counter a MDEL or the application process, please contact the Medical Device Establishment Licensing Unit at hc.mdel.questions.leim.sc@canada.ca. If you have questions about invoicing and fees for an MDEL application, please contact the Cost Recovery Invoicing Unit at hc.criu-ufrc.sc@canada.ca. Related linksMDEL Bulletin, June 15, 2021, from the Medical Devices Compliance Program On this page Rapid antigen tests and the how to get cialis over the counter workplace screening program There are currently various technologies to detect SARS CoV-2, the cialis that causes erectile dysfunction treatment. Antigen-based testing devices detect specific proteins on the surface of the cialis and typically provide results in less than 1 hour. While some rapid antigen detection tests (RADTs) have been approved for people without symptoms, most RADTs are indicated for use on people with symptoms and are to be conducted by laboratory personnel, healthcare professionals or trained operators.

Health Canada has authorized several RADTs under how to get cialis over the counter two interim orders. The indications and conditions of use of authorized products may change over time as manufacturers continue to collect data. Screening asymptomatic individuals for SARS CoV-2 is proving to be effective in high-risk settings where social distancing and other measures how to get cialis over the counter are not feasible. Through the workplace screening program, Canada is supplying RADTs to eligible workplaces across the country. The program will help companies detect early cases of erectile dysfunction treatment, for people who are asymptomatic.

This program is being administered in collaboration with how to get cialis over the counter the provinces and territories. Interim enforcement approach In the interest of public health, Health Canada is placing less priority on enforcing off-label distribution of RADTs under the following circumstances. This enforcement discretion will be in how to get cialis over the counter effect until December 31, 2021. The exception is if. post-market monitoring identifies new risks or there’s no longer a need to apply this discretion based on public health status Related links.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, you may take it when you remember but do not take more than one dose per day.

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MORTON, MS – cialis before and after photos After investigations by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division (WHD), three Mississippi poultry processing plants have paid $45,719 in back wages to 129 employees to resolve minimum wage and overtime violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). WHD investigated cialis before and after photos Peco Foods Inc., headquartered in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and operating in Canton, Mississippi. Koch Foods of Mississippi LLC, headquartered in Park Ridge, Illinois, and operating in Morton, Mississippi.

And Pearl River Foods LLC, headquartered in Gainesville, Georgia, and operating in Carthage, Mississippi. The cialis before and after photos investigations found the employers failed to pay final paychecks to multiple workers, resulting in minimum wage violations. In addition, WHD found Pearl River Foods made illegal deductions from some employees’ paychecks for uniform items like gloves and aprons, resulting in minimum wage violations when those deductions caused employees’ rates of pay to fall below the federal minimum wage. WHD also determined Koch Foods of Mississippi failed to include production bonuses in employees’ regular rates of pay when calculating overtime.

Excluding those cialis before and after photos bonuses, and basing overtime only on workers’ hourly rates, resulted in the employer paying overtime at rates lower than those required by law. WHD also assessed Koch Foods a $1,693 civil penalty for violating child labor requirements of the FLSA when they employed a 15-year-old minor to work in meat processing, a prohibited occupation for workers under the age of 18. “Employers must pay their employees all of the wages they have earned for all of the hours they have worked, no later than their regularly scheduled payday. In addition, child labor laws exist to ensure that when young people work, the work does not jeopardize their health and well-being,” cialis before and after photos said Wage and Hour Division District Director Audrey Hall, in Jackson, Mississippi.

€œThe U.S. Department of Labor is committed to educating employers and improving compliance with federal wage laws to protect American workers. We encourage employers to reach out to us with questions and to use the wide variety of tools we cialis before and after photos offer to ensure they clearly understand their responsibilities.” The Department offers numerous resources to ensure employers have the tools they need to understand their responsibilities and to comply with federal law, such as online videos and confidential calls to local WHD offices. For more information about the FLSA and other laws enforced by the Wage and Hour Division, contact the toll-free helpline at 866-4US-WAGE (487-9243).

Employers that discover overtime or minimum cialis before and after photos wage violations may self-report and resolve those violations without litigation through the PAID program. Information is also available at https://www.dol.gov/agencies/whd. WHD’s mission is to promote and achieve compliance with labor standards to protect and enhance the welfare of the nation’s workforce. WHD enforces federal minimum wage, overtime pay, recordkeeping and child labor cialis before and after photos requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

WHD also enforces the paid sick leave and expanded family and medical leave requirements of the Families First erectile dysfunction Response Act, the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act, the Employee Polygraph Protection Act, the Family and Medical Leave Act, wage garnishment provisions of the Consumer Credit Protection Act and a number of employment standards and worker protections as provided in several immigration related statutes. Additionally, WHD administers and enforces the prevailing wage requirements of the Davis-Bacon Act and the Service Contract Act and other statutes applicable to federal contracts for construction and for the provision of goods and services. The mission of the Department of Labor is to foster, promote and develop the welfare of the wage earners, job seekers and retirees cialis before and after photos of the United States. Improve working conditions.

Advance opportunities for profitable employment. And assure work-related benefits and rights.WASHINGTON, cialis before and after photos DC – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and its Wage and Hour Division (WHD) remind employers of their responsibility to protect worker safety and pay during the holiday season.As the nation enters a unique holiday shopping season, employers must ensure that they train all workers to recognize and prevent job hazards, and incorporate safe work practices to prevent exposure to the erectile dysfunction. At the same time, employers must also familiarize themselves and comply with federal rules governing the payment of wages for temporary or seasonal workers.

“Throughout the holiday season, all employees, including seasonal workers, should be trained not only on how to perform their jobs safely, but also on how to stay safe from the erectile dysfunction,” said Principal cialis before and after photos Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Loren Sweatt. €œEvery worker deserves a safe and healthful workplace, whether they are packing boxes, stocking shelves, delivering products or selling merchandise.” OSHA offers resources on holiday workplace safety for warehousing, delivery and retail workers. Guidance is also available for protecting workers from exposure to the erectile dysfunction in retail and high customer-volume environments, stockrooms and loading docks, and package delivery. Additional information is available on workers’ rights, the protection of temporary and seasonal workers, as well cialis before and after photos as safety for young workers.

Temporary or seasonal employees hired to provide additional help have the right to a safe and healthful workplace, and to be paid for the work performed. With added seasonal hiring, employees unfamiliar with working in cialis before and after photos seasonal positions and employers unaccustomed to hiring part-time and/or seasonal employees may not be fully aware of the rules that regulate such work. €œWhile retail employees work hard during the holiday season to serve shoppers and help the economy thrive, they have bills to pay. We need to ensure workers are paid their rightful wages,” said Wage and Hour Division Administrator Cheryl Stanton.

€œWith more temporary and part-time workers employed during the holidays, it’s important that we inform these workers and their employers about rules concerning work hours, wages and employment conditions, including their rights to paid sick leave under the Families First erectile dysfunction Response Act.” WHD enforces cialis before and after photos federal minimum wage, overtime pay, recordkeeping and child labor requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Common holiday season labor violations include failing to pay salespeople and cashiers for time spent prepping or closing out a register. Requiring stock room and warehouse personnel to work through breaks without compensation. And not providing overtime pay to employees working more than cialis before and after photos 40 hours in a workweek.

Learn more by viewing WHD’s guide for Seasonal Employment. Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help cialis before and after photos ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

The mission of the Department of Labor is to foster, promote and develop the welfare of the wage earners, job seekers and retirees of the United States. Improve working cialis before and after photos conditions. Advance opportunities for profitable employment. And assure work-related benefits and rights..

MORTON, MS how to get cialis over the counter – After investigations by the where to buy cheap cialis U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division (WHD), three Mississippi poultry processing plants have paid $45,719 in back wages to 129 employees to resolve minimum wage and overtime violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). WHD investigated Peco Foods how to get cialis over the counter Inc., headquartered in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and operating in Canton, Mississippi. Koch Foods of Mississippi LLC, headquartered in Park Ridge, Illinois, and operating in Morton, Mississippi. And Pearl River Foods LLC, headquartered in Gainesville, Georgia, and operating in Carthage, Mississippi.

The investigations found the employers failed to pay final paychecks how to get cialis over the counter to multiple workers, resulting in minimum wage violations. In addition, WHD found Pearl River Foods made illegal deductions from some employees’ paychecks for uniform items like gloves and aprons, resulting in minimum wage violations when those deductions caused employees’ rates of pay to fall below the federal minimum wage. WHD also determined Koch Foods of Mississippi failed to include production bonuses in employees’ regular rates of pay when calculating overtime. Excluding those bonuses, and basing overtime only on workers’ hourly rates, resulted in the employer paying overtime at rates lower than those required by how to get cialis over the counter law. WHD also assessed Koch Foods a $1,693 civil penalty for violating child labor requirements of the FLSA when they employed a 15-year-old minor to work in meat processing, a prohibited occupation for workers under the age of 18.

“Employers must pay their employees all of the wages they have earned for all of the hours they have worked, no later than their regularly scheduled payday. In addition, child labor laws exist to how to get cialis over the counter ensure that when young people work, the work does not jeopardize their health and well-being,” said Wage and Hour Division District Director Audrey Hall, in Jackson, Mississippi. €œThe U.S. Department of Labor is committed to educating employers and improving compliance with federal wage laws to protect American workers. We encourage employers to reach out to us with questions and to use the wide variety of tools we offer to ensure they clearly understand their responsibilities.” The Department offers numerous resources to ensure employers have the tools they need to understand their responsibilities and to comply with federal law, such as online videos how to get cialis over the counter and confidential calls to local WHD offices.

For more information about the FLSA and other laws enforced by the Wage and Hour Division, contact the toll-free helpline at 866-4US-WAGE (487-9243). Employers that discover overtime or minimum wage violations how to get cialis over the counter may self-report and resolve those violations without litigation through the PAID program. Information is also available at https://www.dol.gov/agencies/whd. WHD’s mission is to promote and achieve compliance with labor standards to protect and enhance the welfare of the nation’s workforce. WHD enforces federal minimum wage, how to get cialis over the counter overtime pay, recordkeeping and child labor requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

WHD also enforces the paid sick leave and expanded family and medical leave requirements of the Families First erectile dysfunction Response Act, the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act, the Employee Polygraph Protection Act, the Family and Medical Leave Act, wage garnishment provisions of the Consumer Credit Protection Act and a number of employment standards and worker protections as provided in several immigration related statutes. Additionally, WHD administers and enforces the prevailing wage requirements of the Davis-Bacon Act and the Service Contract Act and other statutes applicable to federal contracts for construction and for the provision of goods and services. The mission of the Department of Labor is to foster, promote and develop the welfare of the wage earners, job seekers how to get cialis over the counter and retirees of the United States. Improve working conditions. Advance opportunities for profitable http://www.em-erables-horbourg-wihr.site.ac-strasbourg.fr/classeb/?p=451 employment.

And assure how to get cialis over the counter work-related benefits and rights.WASHINGTON, DC – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and its Wage and Hour Division (WHD) remind employers of their responsibility to protect worker safety and pay during the holiday season.As the nation enters a unique holiday shopping season, employers must ensure that they train all workers to recognize and prevent job hazards, and incorporate safe work practices to prevent exposure to the erectile dysfunction. At the same time, employers must also familiarize themselves and comply with federal rules governing the payment of wages for temporary or seasonal workers. “Throughout the holiday season, all employees, including seasonal workers, should be trained not only on how to perform their jobs safely, but also on how to stay safe from the erectile dysfunction,” said Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and how to get cialis over the counter Health Loren Sweatt. €œEvery worker deserves a safe and healthful workplace, whether they are packing boxes, stocking shelves, delivering products or selling merchandise.” OSHA offers resources on holiday workplace safety for warehousing, delivery and retail workers.

Guidance is also available for protecting workers from exposure to the erectile dysfunction in retail and high customer-volume environments, stockrooms and loading docks, and package delivery. Additional information is how to get cialis over the counter available on workers’ rights, the protection of temporary and seasonal workers, as well as safety for young workers. Temporary or seasonal employees hired to provide additional help have the right to a safe and healthful workplace, and to be paid for the work performed. With added seasonal hiring, employees unfamiliar with working in seasonal positions and employers unaccustomed to hiring part-time and/or seasonal employees may not be fully aware of the rules that regulate how to get cialis over the counter such work. €œWhile retail employees work hard during the holiday season to serve shoppers and help the economy thrive, they have bills to pay.

We need to ensure workers are paid their rightful wages,” said Wage and Hour Division Administrator Cheryl Stanton. €œWith more temporary and part-time workers employed during the holidays, it’s important that we inform these workers and their employers about rules concerning work hours, wages and employment conditions, including their rights to paid sick leave under the Families First erectile dysfunction Response Act.” WHD how to get cialis over the counter enforces federal minimum wage, overtime pay, recordkeeping and child labor requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Common holiday season labor violations include failing to pay salespeople and cashiers for time spent prepping or closing out a register. Requiring stock room and warehouse personnel to work through breaks without compensation. And not providing overtime pay to employees working more than 40 hours how to get cialis over the counter in a workweek.

Learn more by viewing WHD’s guide for Seasonal Employment. Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to help ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing how to get cialis over the counter training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov. The mission of the Department of Labor is to foster, promote and develop the welfare of the wage earners, job seekers and retirees of the United States.

Improve working how to get cialis over the counter conditions. Advance opportunities for profitable employment. And assure work-related benefits and rights..

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How to where can you get cialis cite this article:Singh OP. The need for routine psychiatric assessment of erectile dysfunction treatment survivors. Indian J Psychiatry 2020;62:457-8erectile dysfunction treatment where can you get cialis cialis is expected to bring a Tsunami of mental health issues. Public health emergencies may affect the well-being, safety, and security of both individuals and communities, which lead to a range of emotional reactions, unhealthy behavior, and noncompliance, with public health directives (such as home confinement and vaccination) in people who contact the disease as well as in the general population.[1] Thus far, there has been an increased emphasis on psychosocial factors such as loneliness, effect of quarantine, uncertainty, vulnerability to erectile dysfunction treatment , economic factors, and career difficulties, which may lead to increased psychiatric morbidity.Time has now come to pay attention to the direct effect of the cialis on brain and psychiatric adverse symptoms, resulting from the treatment provided. Viral s are known to be associated with psychiatric disorders such as where can you get cialis depression, bipolar disorder, obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), or schizophrenia.

There was an increased incidence of psychiatric disorders following the Influenza cialis. Karl Menninger described where can you get cialis 100 cases of influenza presenting with psychiatric sequelae, which could mainly be categorized as dementia praecox, delirium, other psychoses, and unclassified subtypes. Dementia praecox constituted the largest number among all these cases.[2] Neuroinflammation is now known as the key factor in genesis and exacerbation of psychiatric disorders, particularly depression and bipolar disorders.Emerging evidence points toward the neurotropic properties of the erectile dysfunction cialis. Loss of smell and taste as an initial symptom points where can you get cialis toward early involvement of olfactory bulb. The rapid spread to brain has been demonstrated through retrograde axonal transport.[3] The cialis can enter the brain through endothelial cells lining the blood–brain barrier and also through other nerves such as the vagus nerve.[4] Cytokine storm, a serious immune reaction to the cialis, can activate brain glial cells, leading to delirium, depression, bipolar disorder, and OCD.Studies examining psychiatric disorders in acute patients suffering from erectile dysfunction treatment found almost 40% of such patients suffering from anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder.[5] The data on long-term psychiatric sequelae in patients who have recovered from acute illness are limited.

There are anecdotal reports of psychosis and mania occurring in patients of erectile dysfunction treatment following discharge from hospital. This may be either due to the direct effect of the cialis on the brain or due to the neuropsychiatric effects of where can you get cialis drugs used to treat the or its complications. For example, behavioral toxicity of high-dose corticosteroids which are frequently used during the treatment of severe cases to prevent and manage cytokine storm.The patients with erectile dysfunction treatment can present with many neuropsychiatric disorders, which may be caused by direct inflammation, central nervous system effects of cytokine storm, aberrant epigenetic modifications of stress-related genes, glial activation, or treatment emergent effects.[6] To assess and manage various neuropsychiatric complications of erectile dysfunction treatment, the psychiatric community at large should equip itself with appropriate assessment tools and management guidelines to effectively tackle this unprecedented wave of psychiatric ailments. References 1.Pfefferbaum B, North CS where can you get cialis. Mental health and the erectile dysfunction treatment cialis.

N Engl J Med 2020;383:510-2 where can you get cialis. 2.Lu H, Stratton CW, Tang YW. Outbreak of pneumonia of unknown etiology in Wuhan, China where can you get cialis. The mystery and the miracle. J Med Virol 2020;92:401-2.

3.Fodoulian L, Tuberosa J, Rossier D, Landis BN, Carleton A, Rodriguez where can you get cialis I. erectile dysfunction receptor and entry genes are expressed by sustentacular cells in the human olfactory neuroepithelium. BioRxiv 2020.03.31.013268 where can you get cialis. Doi. Https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.03.31.013268.

4.Lochhead JJ, Thorne RG. Intranasal delivery of biologics to the central nervous system. Adv Drug Deliv Rev 2012;64:614-28. 5.Rogers JP, Chesney E, Oliver D, Pollak TA, McGuire P, Fusar-Poli P, et al. Psychiatric and neuropsychiatric presentations associated with severe erectile dysfunction s.

A systematic review and meta-analysis with comparison to the erectile dysfunction treatment cialis. Lancet Psychiatry 2020;7:611-27. 6.Steardo L Jr., Steardo L, Verkhratsky A. Psychiatric face of erectile dysfunction treatment. Transl Psychiatry 2020;10:261.

Correspondence Address:Om Prakash SinghAA 304, Ashabari Apartments, O/31, Baishnabghata, Patuli Township, Kolkata - 700 094, West Bengal IndiaSource of Support. None, Conflict of Interest. NoneDOI. 10.4103/indianjpsychiatry.indianjpsychiatry_1169_2Abstract The erectile dysfunction treatment cialis has emerged as a major stressor of a global scale, affecting all aspects of our lives, and is likely to contribute to a surge of mental ill health. Ancient Hindu scriptures, notably the Bhagavad Gita, have a wealth of insights that can help approaches to build psychological resilience for individuals at risk, those affected, as well as for caregivers.

The path of knowledge (Jnana yoga) promotes accurate awareness of nature of the self, and can help reframe our thinking from an “I” to a “we mode,” much needed for collectively mitigating the spread of the erectile dysfunction. The path of action (Karma yoga) teaches the art of selfless action, providing caregivers and frontline health-care providers a framework to continue efforts in the face of uncertain consequences. Finally, the path of meditation (Raja yoga) offers a multipronged approach to healthy lifestyle and mindful meditation, which may improve resilience to the illness and its severe consequences. While more work is needed to empirically examine the potential value of each of these approaches in modern psychotherapy, the principles herein may already help individuals facing and providing care for the erectile dysfunction treatment cialis.Keywords. Bhagavad Gita, erectile dysfunction treatment, YogaHow to cite this article:Keshavan MS.

Building resilience in the erectile dysfunction treatment era. Three paths in the Bhagavad Gita. Indian J Psychiatry 2020;62:459-61The erectile dysfunction treatment crisis has changed our world in just a matter of months, thrusting us into danger, uncertainty, fear, and of course social isolation. At the time of this writing, over 11 million individuals have been affected worldwide (India is fourth among all countries, 674,515) and over half a million people have died. The erectile dysfunction treatment cialis has been an unprecedented global stressor, not only because of the disease burden and mortality but also because of economic upheaval.

The very fabric of the society is disrupted, affecting housing, personal relationships, travel, and all aspects of lifestyle. The overwhelmed health-care system is among the most major stressors, leading to a heightened sense of vulnerability. No definitive treatments or treatment is on the horizon yet. Psychiatry has to brace up to an expected mental health crisis resulting from this global stressor, not only with regard to treating neuropsychiatric consequences but also with regard to developing preventive approaches and building resilience.Thankfully, there is a wealth of wisdom to help us in our ancient scriptures such as the Bhagavad Gita[1] for building psychological resilience. The Bhagavad Gita is a dialog between the Pandava prince Arjuna and his charioteer Krishna in the epic Mahabharata, the great tale of the Bharata Dynasty, authored by Sage Vyasa (c.

4–5 B.C.E.). The dialog occurs in the 6th chapter of the epic and has over 700 verses. In this epic story, Arjuna, the righteous Pandava hero was faced with the dilemma of waging a war against his cousins, the Kauravas, for territory. Arjuna is confused and has no will to initiate the war. In this context, Krishna, his charioteer and spiritual mentor, counsels him.

The key principles of this spiritual discourse in the Gita are embodied in the broad concept of yoga, which literally means “Yog” or “to unite.” Applying three tenets of yoga can greatly help developing resilience at individual, group, and societal levels. A fourth path, Bhakti yoga, is a spiritual approach in the Gita which emphasizes loving devotion toward a higher power or principle, which may or may not involve a personal god. In this editorial, I focus on three paths that have considerable relevance to modern approaches to reliance-focused psychotherapy that may be especially relevant in the erectile dysfunction treatment era. Path of Knowledge The first concept in the Gita is the path of knowledge (Jnana Yoga, chapter 2). The fundamental goal of Jnana yoga is to liberate oneself from the limited view of the individual ego, and to develop the awareness of one's self as part of a larger, universal self.

Hindu philosophers were among the earliest to ask the question of “who am I” and concluded that the self is not what it seems. The self as we all know is a collection of our physical, mental, and social attributes that we create for ourselves with input from our perceptions, and input by our families and society. Such a world view leads to a tendency to crave for the “I” and for what is mine, and not consider the “We.” As Krishna in the Bhagavad Gita points out, the person who sees oneself in others, and others in oneself, really “sees.” Such awareness, which guides action in service of self as well as others, is critically important in our goals of collectively preventing the spread of the erectile dysfunction. A glaring example is the use of face masks, known to effectively slow the viral . Using the mask is as important to protecting oneself from the cialis as well as protecting others from oneself.

Nations such as the USA (and their leaders), who have given mixed messages to the public about the need to wear masks, have been showing a strikingly high number of cases as well as mortality. Unfortunately, such reluctance to wear masks (and thus model protective hygiene for the population), as in the case of the US leader, has stemmed from ego or vanity-related issues (i.e., how he would appear to other leaders!. ). This factor may at least partly underlie the worse erectile dysfunction treatment outcome in the USA. The simple lesson here is that it is important to first flatten the ego if one wants to flatten the cialis curve!.

Path of Action The second key concept is the path of action (Karma yoga, chapter 3). Karma yoga is all about taking action without thinking, “what's in it for me.” As such, it seeks to mainly let go of one's ego. In the Bhagavad Gita, Arjuna is ambivalent about fighting because of the conflict regarding the outcome brought on by waging the war, i.e., having to kill some of his own kith and kin. Krishna reminds him that he should not hesitate, because it is his nature and duty (or Dharma), as a warrior, to protect the larger good, though it will have some downside consequences. The frontline health-care worker caring for severely ill patients with erectile dysfunction treatment is likely to have a similar emotional reaction as Arjuna, facing a lack of adequate treatments, high likelihood of mortality and of unpredictable negative outcomes, and risk to him/herself.

Compounding this, especially when resources such as ventilators are limited, the doctor may have to make tough decisions of whose life to save and whose not. Adding to this are personal emotions when facing with the death of patients, having to deliver bad news, and dealing with grieving relatives.[2] All these are likely to result in emotional anguish and guilt, leading to burnout and a war “neurosis.”So, what should the frontline health-care provider should do?. Krishna's counsel would be that the doctor should continue to perform his/her own dharma, but do so without desire or attachment, thereby performing action in the spirit of Karma yoga. Such action would be with detachment, without a desire for personal gain and being unperturbed by success or failure. Such “Nishkaama Karma” (or selfless action) may help doctors working today in the erectile dysfunction treatment outbreak to carry forward their work with compassion, and accept the results of their actions with equanimity and without guilt.

Krishna points out that training one's mind to engage in selfless action is not easy but requires practice (Abhyasa). Krishna is also emphatic about the need to protect oneself, in order to be able to effectively carry out one's duties. Path of Meditation The third core concept in the Gita is the path of meditation and self-reflection (Raja yoga, or Dhyana yoga, chapter 6). It is considered the royal path (Raja means royal) for attaining self-realization, and often considered the 8-fold path of yoga (Ashtanga yoga) designed to discipline lifestyle, the body and mind toward realizing mindfulness and self-reflection. These techniques, which originated in India over two millennia ago, have evolved over recent decades and anticipate several approaches to contemplative psychotherapy, including dialectical behavior therapy, acceptance and commitment therapy, and mindfulness-based stress reduction.[3] These approaches are of particular relevance for stress reduction and resilience building in individuals faced by erectile dysfunction treatment-related emotional difficulties as well as health-care providers.[4]The majority of people affected by the erectile dysfunction treatment cialis recover, but about 20% have severe disease, and the mortality is around 5%.

Older individuals, those with obesity and comorbid medical illnesses such as diabetes and lung disease, are particularly prone to developing severe disease. It is possible that a state of chronic low-grade inflammation which underlies each of these conditions may increase the risk of disproportionate host immune reactions (with excessive release of cytokines), characterizing severe disease in those with erectile dysfunction treatment.[4] With this in mind, it is important to note that exercise, some forms of meditation, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant diet (such as turmeric and melatonin), and yoga have known benefits in reducing inflammation.[5],[6],[7],[8],[9] Sleep loss also elevates inflammatory cytokines. Healthy sleep may reduce inflammation.[10] Clearly, a healthy lifestyle, including healthy sleep, exercise, and diet, may be protective against developing erectile dysfunction treatment-related severe complications. These principles of healthy living are beautifully summarized in the Bhagavad Gita.Yuktahara-viharasya yukta-cestasya karmasuYukta-svapnavabodhasya yogo bhavati duhkha-haHe who is temperate in his habits of eating, sleeping, working and recreation can mitigate all sorrows by practicing the yoga system.–Bhagavad Gita, Chapter 6, verse 17.The relevance of the Bhagavad Gita for modern psychotherapy has been widely reviewed.[11],[12] However, relatively little empirical literature exists on the effectiveness of versus spiritually integrated psychotherapy incorporating Hindu psychotherapeutic insights. Clearly, more work is needed, and erectile dysfunction treatment may provide an opportunity for conducting further empirical research.[13] In the meantime, using the principles outlined here may already be of benefit in helping those in need, and may be rapidly enabled in the emerging era of telehealth and digital health.[14]Financial support and sponsorshipNil.Conflicts of interestThere are no conflicts of interest.

References 1.Pandurangi AK, Shenoy S, Keshavan MS. Psychotherapy in the Bhagavad Gita, the Hindu scriptural text. Am J Psychiatry 2014;171:827-8. 2.Arango C. Lessons learned from the erectile dysfunction health crisis in Madrid, Spain.

How erectile dysfunction treatment has changed our lives in the last 2 weeks [published online ahead of print, 2020 Apr 8]. Biol Psychiatry 2020;26:S0006-3223 (20) 31493-1. [doi. 10.1016/j.biopsych. 2020.04.003].

3.Keshavan MS, Gangadhar GN, Hinduism PA. In. Spirituality and Mental Health Across Cultures, Evidence-Based Implications for Clinical Practice. Oxford, England. Oxford University Press.

In Press. 4.Habersaat KB, Betsch C, Danchin M, Sunstein CR, Böhm R, Falk A, et al. Ten considerations for effectively managing the erectile dysfunction treatment transition. Nat Hum Behav 2020;4:677-87. Doi.

10.1038/s41562-020-0906-x. Epub 2020 Jun 24. 5.Kumar K. Building resilience to erectile dysfunction treatment disease severity. J Med Res Pract 2020;9:1-7.

6.Bushell W, Castle R, Williams MA, Brouwer KC, Tanzi RE, Chopra D, et al. Meditation and Yoga practices as potential adjunctive treatment of erectile dysfunction and erectile dysfunction treatment. A brief overview of key subjects [published online ahead of print, 2020 Jun 22]. J Altern Complement Med 2020;26:10.1089/acm. 2020.0177.

[doi. 10.1089/acm. 2020.0177]. 7.Gupta H, Gupta M, Bhargava S. Potential use of turmeric in erectile dysfunction treatment [published online ahead of print, 2020 Jul 1].

Clin Exp Dermatol. 2020;10.1111/ced.14357. Doi:10.1111/ced.14357. 8.Damiot A, Pinto AJ, Turner JE, Gualano B. Immunological implications of physical inactivity among older adults during the erectile dysfunction treatment cialis [published online ahead of print, 2020 Jun 25].

Gerontology 2020:26;1-8. [doi. 10.1159/000509216]. 9.El-Missiry MA, El-Missiry ZM, Othman AI. Melatonin is a potential adjuvant to improve clinical outcomes in individuals with obesity and diabetes with coexistence of erectile dysfunction treatment [published online ahead of print, 2020 Jun 29].

Eur J Pharmacol 2020;882:173329. 10.Mullington JM, Simpson NS, Meier-Ewert HK, Haack M. Sleep loss and inflammation. Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab 2010;24:775-84. 11.Balodhi JP, Keshavan MS.

Bhagavad Gita and psychotherapy. Asian J Psychiatr 2011;4:300-2. 12.Bhatia SC, Madabushi J, Kolli V, Bhatia SK, Madaan V. The Bhagavad Gita and contemporary psychotherapies. Indian J Psychiatry 2013;55:S315-21.

13.Keshavan MS. cialiss and psychiatry. Repositioning research in context of erectile dysfunction treatment [published online ahead of print, 2020 May 7]. Asian J Psychiatr 2020;51:102159. [doi.

10.1016/j.ajp. 2020.102159]. 14.Torous J, Keshavan M. erectile dysfunction treatment, mobile health and serious mental illness. Schizophr Res 2020;218:36-7.

Correspondence Address:Matcheri S KeshavanRoom 542, Massachusetts Mental Health Center, 75 Fenwood Road, Boston, MA 02115 USASource of Support. None, Conflict of Interest. NoneDOI. 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_829_20.

How to cite this article:Singh this article OP how to get cialis over the counter. The need for routine psychiatric assessment of erectile dysfunction treatment survivors. Indian J Psychiatry 2020;62:457-8erectile dysfunction treatment cialis is expected to bring a Tsunami of mental health issues how to get cialis over the counter. Public health emergencies may affect the well-being, safety, and security of both individuals and communities, which lead to a range of emotional reactions, unhealthy behavior, and noncompliance, with public health directives (such as home confinement and vaccination) in people who contact the disease as well as in the general population.[1] Thus far, there has been an increased emphasis on psychosocial factors such as loneliness, effect of quarantine, uncertainty, vulnerability to erectile dysfunction treatment , economic factors, and career difficulties, which may lead to increased psychiatric morbidity.Time has now come to pay attention to the direct effect of the cialis on brain and psychiatric adverse symptoms, resulting from the treatment provided. Viral s are known how to get cialis over the counter to be associated with psychiatric disorders such as depression, bipolar disorder, obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), or schizophrenia.

There was an increased incidence of psychiatric disorders following the Influenza cialis. Karl Menninger described 100 cases of influenza presenting with psychiatric sequelae, which could mainly be categorized as how to get cialis over the counter dementia praecox, delirium, other psychoses, and unclassified subtypes. Dementia praecox constituted the largest number among all these cases.[2] Neuroinflammation is now known as the key factor in genesis and exacerbation of psychiatric disorders, particularly depression and bipolar disorders.Emerging evidence points toward the neurotropic properties of the erectile dysfunction cialis. Loss of smell and how to get cialis over the counter taste as an initial symptom points toward early involvement of olfactory bulb. The rapid spread to brain has been demonstrated through retrograde axonal transport.[3] The cialis can enter the brain through endothelial cells lining the blood–brain barrier and also through other nerves such as the vagus nerve.[4] Cytokine storm, a serious immune reaction to the cialis, can activate brain glial cells, leading to delirium, depression, bipolar disorder, and OCD.Studies examining psychiatric disorders in acute patients suffering from erectile dysfunction treatment found almost 40% of such patients suffering from anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder.[5] The data on long-term psychiatric sequelae in patients who have recovered from acute illness are limited.

There are anecdotal reports of psychosis and mania occurring in patients of erectile dysfunction treatment following discharge from hospital. This may be either due to the direct effect of the cialis on the brain or due how to get cialis over the counter to the neuropsychiatric effects of drugs used to treat the or its complications. For example, behavioral toxicity of high-dose corticosteroids which are frequently used during the treatment of severe cases to prevent and manage cytokine storm.The patients with erectile dysfunction treatment can present with many neuropsychiatric disorders, which may be caused by direct inflammation, central nervous system effects of cytokine storm, aberrant epigenetic modifications of stress-related genes, glial activation, or treatment emergent effects.[6] To assess and manage various neuropsychiatric complications of erectile dysfunction treatment, the psychiatric community at large should equip itself with appropriate assessment tools and management guidelines to effectively tackle this unprecedented wave of psychiatric ailments. References 1.Pfefferbaum B, North CS how to get cialis over the counter. Mental health and the erectile dysfunction treatment cialis.

N Engl J Med 2020;383:510-2 how to get cialis over the counter. 2.Lu H, Stratton CW, Tang YW. Outbreak of pneumonia of unknown etiology in how to get cialis over the counter Wuhan, China. The mystery and the miracle. J Med Virol 2020;92:401-2.

3.Fodoulian L, Tuberosa how to get cialis over the counter J, Rossier D, Landis BN, Carleton A, Rodriguez I. erectile dysfunction receptor and entry genes are expressed by sustentacular cells in the human olfactory neuroepithelium. BioRxiv 2020.03.31.013268 how to get cialis over the counter. Doi. Https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.03.31.013268.

4.Lochhead JJ, Thorne RG. Intranasal delivery of biologics to the central nervous system. Adv Drug Deliv Rev 2012;64:614-28. 5.Rogers JP, Chesney E, Oliver D, Pollak TA, McGuire P, Fusar-Poli P, et al. Psychiatric and neuropsychiatric presentations associated with severe erectile dysfunction s.

A systematic review and meta-analysis with comparison to the erectile dysfunction treatment cialis. Lancet Psychiatry 2020;7:611-27. 6.Steardo L Jr., Steardo L, Verkhratsky A. Psychiatric face of erectile dysfunction treatment. Transl Psychiatry 2020;10:261.

Correspondence Address:Om Prakash SinghAA 304, Ashabari Apartments, O/31, Baishnabghata, Patuli Township, Kolkata - 700 094, West Bengal IndiaSource of Support. None, Conflict of Interest. NoneDOI. 10.4103/indianjpsychiatry.indianjpsychiatry_1169_2Abstract The erectile dysfunction treatment cialis has emerged as a major stressor of a global scale, affecting all aspects of our lives, and is likely to contribute to a surge of mental ill health. Ancient Hindu scriptures, notably the Bhagavad Gita, have a wealth of insights that can help approaches to build psychological resilience for individuals at risk, those affected, as well as for caregivers.

The path of knowledge (Jnana yoga) promotes accurate awareness of nature of the self, and can help reframe our thinking from an “I” to a “we mode,” much needed for collectively mitigating the spread of the erectile dysfunction. The path of action (Karma yoga) teaches the art of selfless action, providing caregivers and frontline health-care providers a framework to continue efforts in the face of uncertain consequences. Finally, the path of meditation (Raja yoga) offers a multipronged approach to healthy lifestyle and mindful meditation, which may improve resilience to the illness and its severe consequences. While more work is needed to empirically examine the potential value of each of these approaches in modern psychotherapy, the principles herein may already help individuals facing and providing care for the erectile dysfunction treatment cialis.Keywords. Bhagavad Gita, erectile dysfunction treatment, YogaHow to cite this article:Keshavan MS.

Building resilience in the erectile dysfunction treatment era. Three paths in the Bhagavad Gita. Indian J Psychiatry 2020;62:459-61The erectile dysfunction treatment crisis has changed our world in just a matter of months, thrusting us into danger, uncertainty, fear, and of course social isolation. At the time of this writing, over 11 million individuals have been affected worldwide (India is fourth among all countries, 674,515) and over half a million people have died. The erectile dysfunction treatment cialis has been an unprecedented global stressor, not only because of the disease burden and mortality but also because of economic upheaval.

The very fabric of the society is disrupted, affecting housing, personal relationships, travel, and all aspects of lifestyle. The overwhelmed health-care system is among the most major stressors, leading to a heightened sense of vulnerability. No definitive treatments or treatment is on the horizon yet. Psychiatry has to brace up to an expected mental health crisis resulting from this global stressor, not only with regard to treating neuropsychiatric consequences but also with regard to developing preventive approaches and building resilience.Thankfully, there is a wealth of wisdom to help us in our ancient scriptures such as the Bhagavad Gita[1] for building psychological resilience. The Bhagavad Gita is a dialog between the Pandava prince Arjuna and his charioteer Krishna in the epic Mahabharata, the great tale of the Bharata Dynasty, authored by Sage Vyasa (c.

4–5 B.C.E.). The dialog occurs in the 6th chapter of the epic and has over 700 verses. In this epic story, Arjuna, the righteous Pandava hero was faced with the dilemma of waging a war against his cousins, the Kauravas, for territory. Arjuna is confused and has no will to initiate the war. In this context, Krishna, his charioteer and spiritual mentor, counsels him.

The key principles of this spiritual discourse in the Gita are embodied in the broad concept of yoga, which literally means “Yog” or “to unite.” Applying three tenets of yoga can greatly help developing resilience at individual, group, and societal levels. A fourth path, Bhakti yoga, is a spiritual approach in the Gita which emphasizes loving devotion toward a higher power or principle, which may or may not involve a personal god. In this editorial, I focus on three paths that have considerable relevance to modern approaches to reliance-focused psychotherapy that may be especially relevant in the erectile dysfunction treatment era. Path of Knowledge The first concept in the Gita is the path of knowledge (Jnana Yoga, chapter 2). The fundamental goal of Jnana yoga is to liberate oneself from the limited view of the individual ego, and to develop the awareness of one's self as part of a larger, universal self.

Hindu philosophers were among the earliest to ask the question of “who am I” and concluded that the self is not what it seems. The self as we all know is a collection of our physical, mental, and social attributes that we create for ourselves with input from our perceptions, and input by our families and society. Such a world view leads to a tendency to crave for the “I” and for what is mine, and not consider the “We.” As Krishna in the Bhagavad Gita points out, the person who sees oneself in others, and others in oneself, really “sees.” Such awareness, which guides action in service of self as well as others, is critically important in our goals of collectively preventing the spread of the erectile dysfunction. A glaring example is the use of face masks, known to effectively slow the viral . Using the mask is as important to protecting oneself from the cialis as well as protecting others from oneself.

Nations such as the USA (and their leaders), who have given mixed messages to the public about the need to wear masks, have been showing a strikingly high number of cases as well as mortality. Unfortunately, such reluctance to wear masks (and thus model protective hygiene for the population), as in the case of the US leader, has stemmed from ego or vanity-related issues (i.e., how he would appear to other leaders!. ). This factor may at least partly underlie the worse erectile dysfunction treatment outcome in the USA. The simple lesson here is that it is important to first flatten the ego if one wants to flatten the cialis curve!.

Path of Action The second key concept is the path of action (Karma yoga, chapter 3). Karma yoga is all about taking action without thinking, “what's in it for me.” As such, it seeks to mainly let go of one's ego. In the Bhagavad Gita, Arjuna is ambivalent about fighting because of the conflict regarding the outcome brought on by waging the war, i.e., having to kill some of his own kith and kin. Krishna reminds him that he should not hesitate, because it is his nature and duty (or Dharma), as a warrior, to protect the larger good, though it will have some downside consequences. The frontline health-care worker caring for severely ill patients with erectile dysfunction treatment is likely to have a similar emotional reaction as Arjuna, facing a lack of adequate treatments, high likelihood of mortality and of unpredictable negative outcomes, and risk to him/herself.

Compounding this, especially when resources such as ventilators are limited, the doctor may have to make tough decisions of whose life to save and whose not. Adding to this are personal emotions when facing with the death of patients, having to deliver bad news, and dealing with grieving relatives.[2] All these are likely to result in emotional anguish and guilt, leading to burnout and a war “neurosis.”So, what should the frontline health-care provider should do?. Krishna's counsel would be that the doctor should continue to perform his/her own dharma, but do so without desire or attachment, thereby performing action in the spirit of Karma yoga. Such action would be with detachment, without a desire for personal gain and being unperturbed by success or failure. Such “Nishkaama Karma” (or selfless action) may help doctors working today in the erectile dysfunction treatment outbreak to carry forward their work with compassion, and accept the results of their actions with equanimity and without guilt.

Krishna points out that training one's mind to engage in selfless action is not easy but requires practice (Abhyasa). Krishna is also emphatic about the need to protect oneself, in order to be able to effectively carry out one's duties. Path of Meditation The third core concept in the Gita is the path of meditation and self-reflection (Raja yoga, or Dhyana yoga, chapter 6). It is considered the royal path (Raja means royal) for attaining self-realization, and often considered the 8-fold path of yoga (Ashtanga yoga) designed to discipline lifestyle, the body and mind toward realizing mindfulness and self-reflection. These techniques, which originated in India over two millennia ago, have evolved over recent decades and anticipate several approaches to contemplative psychotherapy, including dialectical behavior therapy, acceptance and commitment therapy, and mindfulness-based stress reduction.[3] These approaches are of particular relevance for stress reduction and resilience building in individuals faced by erectile dysfunction treatment-related emotional difficulties as well as health-care providers.[4]The majority of people affected by the erectile dysfunction treatment cialis recover, but about 20% have severe disease, and the mortality is around 5%.

Older individuals, those with obesity and comorbid medical illnesses such as diabetes and lung disease, are particularly prone to developing severe disease. It is possible that a state of chronic low-grade inflammation which underlies each of these conditions may increase the risk of disproportionate host immune reactions (with excessive release of cytokines), characterizing severe disease in those with erectile dysfunction treatment.[4] With this in mind, it is important to note that exercise, some forms of meditation, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant diet (such as turmeric and melatonin), and yoga have known benefits in reducing inflammation.[5],[6],[7],[8],[9] Sleep loss also elevates inflammatory cytokines. Healthy sleep may reduce inflammation.[10] Clearly, a healthy lifestyle, including healthy sleep, exercise, and diet, may be protective against developing erectile dysfunction treatment-related severe complications. These principles of healthy living are beautifully summarized in the Bhagavad Gita.Yuktahara-viharasya yukta-cestasya karmasuYukta-svapnavabodhasya yogo bhavati duhkha-haHe who is temperate in his habits of eating, sleeping, working and recreation can mitigate all sorrows by practicing the yoga system.–Bhagavad Gita, Chapter 6, verse 17.The relevance of the Bhagavad Gita for modern psychotherapy has been widely reviewed.[11],[12] However, relatively little empirical literature exists on the effectiveness of versus spiritually integrated psychotherapy incorporating Hindu psychotherapeutic insights. Clearly, more work is needed, and erectile dysfunction treatment may provide an opportunity for conducting further empirical research.[13] In the meantime, using the principles outlined here may already be of benefit in helping those in need, and may be rapidly enabled in the emerging era of telehealth and digital health.[14]Financial support and sponsorshipNil.Conflicts of interestThere are no conflicts of interest.

References 1.Pandurangi AK, Shenoy S, Keshavan MS. Psychotherapy in the Bhagavad Gita, the Hindu scriptural text. Am J Psychiatry 2014;171:827-8. 2.Arango C. Lessons learned from the erectile dysfunction health crisis in Madrid, Spain.

How erectile dysfunction treatment has changed our lives in the last 2 weeks [published online ahead of print, 2020 Apr 8]. Biol Psychiatry 2020;26:S0006-3223 (20) 31493-1. [doi. 10.1016/j.biopsych. 2020.04.003].

3.Keshavan MS, Gangadhar GN, Hinduism PA. In. Spirituality and Mental Health Across Cultures, Evidence-Based Implications for Clinical Practice. Oxford, England. Oxford University Press.

In Press. 4.Habersaat KB, Betsch C, Danchin M, Sunstein CR, Böhm R, Falk A, et al. Ten considerations for effectively managing the erectile dysfunction treatment transition. Nat Hum Behav 2020;4:677-87. Doi.

10.1038/s41562-020-0906-x. Epub 2020 Jun 24. 5.Kumar K. Building resilience to erectile dysfunction treatment disease severity. J Med Res Pract 2020;9:1-7.

6.Bushell W, Castle R, Williams MA, Brouwer KC, Tanzi RE, Chopra D, et al. Meditation and Yoga practices as potential adjunctive treatment of erectile dysfunction and erectile dysfunction treatment. A brief overview of key subjects [published online ahead of print, 2020 Jun 22]. J Altern Complement Med 2020;26:10.1089/acm. 2020.0177.

[doi. 10.1089/acm. 2020.0177]. 7.Gupta H, Gupta M, Bhargava S. Potential use of turmeric in erectile dysfunction treatment [published online ahead of print, 2020 Jul 1].

Clin Exp Dermatol. 2020;10.1111/ced.14357. Doi:10.1111/ced.14357. 8.Damiot A, Pinto AJ, Turner JE, Gualano B. Immunological implications of physical inactivity among older adults during the erectile dysfunction treatment cialis [published online ahead of print, 2020 Jun 25].

Gerontology 2020:26;1-8. [doi. 10.1159/000509216]. 9.El-Missiry MA, El-Missiry ZM, Othman AI. Melatonin is a potential adjuvant to improve clinical outcomes in individuals with obesity and diabetes with coexistence of erectile dysfunction treatment [published online ahead of print, 2020 Jun 29].

Eur J Pharmacol 2020;882:173329. 10.Mullington JM, Simpson NS, Meier-Ewert HK, Haack M. Sleep loss and inflammation. Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab 2010;24:775-84. 11.Balodhi JP, Keshavan MS.

Bhagavad Gita and psychotherapy. Asian J Psychiatr 2011;4:300-2. 12.Bhatia SC, Madabushi J, Kolli V, Bhatia SK, Madaan V. The Bhagavad Gita and contemporary psychotherapies. Indian J Psychiatry 2013;55:S315-21.

13.Keshavan MS. cialiss and psychiatry. Repositioning research in context of erectile dysfunction treatment [published online ahead of print, 2020 May 7]. Asian J Psychiatr 2020;51:102159. [doi.

10.1016/j.ajp. 2020.102159]. 14.Torous J, Keshavan M. erectile dysfunction treatment, mobile health and serious mental illness. Schizophr Res 2020;218:36-7.

Correspondence Address:Matcheri S KeshavanRoom 542, Massachusetts Mental Health Center, 75 Fenwood Road, Boston, MA 02115 USASource of Support. None, Conflict of Interest. NoneDOI. 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_829_20.

Cialis soft review

Start Preamble cialis soft review Centers for http://www.ec-st-georges-ii-haguenau.ac-strasbourg.fr/?p=359 Medicare &. Medicaid Services, Health and Human Services (HHS). Notice. The Centers for Medicare &.

Medicaid Services (CMS) is announcing an opportunity for the public to comment on CMS' intention to collect information from the public. Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (the PRA), federal agencies are required to publish notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information (including each proposed extension or reinstatement of an existing collection of information) and to allow 60 days for public comment on the proposed action. Interested persons are invited to send comments regarding our burden estimates or any other aspect of this collection of information, including the necessity and utility of the proposed information collection for the proper performance of the agency's functions, the accuracy of the estimated burden, ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected, and the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology to minimize the information collection burden. Comments must be received by December 21, 2021.

When commenting, please reference the document identifier or OMB control number. To be assured consideration, comments and recommendations must be submitted in any one of the following ways. 1. Electronically.

You may send your comments electronically to http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for “Comment or Submission” or “More Search Options” to find the information collection document(s) that are accepting comments. 2. By regular mail.

You may mail written comments to the following address. CMS, Office of Strategic Operations and Regulatory Affairs, Division of Regulations Development, Attention. Document Identifier/OMB Control Number. __, Room C4-26-05, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, Maryland 21244-1850.

Start Printed Page 58665 To obtain copies of a supporting statement and any related forms for the proposed collection(s) summarized in this notice, you may make your request using one of following. 1. Access CMS' website address at website address at https://www.cms.gov/​Regulations-and-Guidance/​Legislation/​PaperworkReductionActof1995/​PRA-Listing.html. Start Further Info William N.

Parham at (410) 786-4669. End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information Contents This notice sets out a summary of the use and burden associated with the following information collections. More detailed information can be found in each collection's supporting statement and associated materials (see ADDRESSES ). CMS-2567 Statement of Deficiency and Plan of Correction CMS-10790 Medicare-Funded GME Residency Positions in accordance with Section 126 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020 (Pub.

L. 116-93) CMS-10463 Cooperative Agreement to Support Navigators in Federally-facilitated Exchanges Under the PRA (44 U.S.C. 3501-3520), federal agencies must obtain approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for each collection of information they conduct or sponsor. The term “collection of information” is defined in 44 U.S.C.

3502(3) and 5 CFR 1320.3(c) and includes agency requests or requirements that members of the public submit reports, keep records, or provide information to a third party. Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the PRA requires federal agencies to publish a 60-day notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information, including each proposed extension or reinstatement of an existing collection of information, before submitting the collection to OMB for approval. To comply with this requirement, CMS is publishing this notice. Information Collection 1.

Type of Information Collection Request. Revision of a currently approved collection. Title of Information Collection. Statement of Deficiency and Plan of Correction Use.

The form CMS-2567 is the means by which State and CMS surveyors document findings of compliance or noncompliance (deficiencies) resulting from inspection of Medicare, Medicaid, and Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) laboratories. The form CMS-2567 is the legal, documentary basis for CMS' certification of a facility's compliance or noncompliance with the Medicare/Medicaid Conditions of Participation or Coverage, and the requirements for Nursing Home participation and CLIA certification. In December, 2020, Congress passed the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 (CAA, 2021). Section 407 of CAA, 2021, amended Part A of Title XVIII of the Social Security Act (the Act) at section 1822 establishing hospice program survey and enforcement requirements.

This amendment, in part, now requires the Accrediting Organizations (AOs) that accredit hospice programs to include the form CMS-2567 to document the findings of their hospice program surveys beginning on October 1, 2021. As of June 2021, there are three AOs with CMS-approved hospice accreditation programs. The AOs survey approximately half of the over 5,000 Medicare-certified hospice programs, while the SAs survey the remaining half. Form Numbers.

CMS-2567 (OMB control number. 0938-0391). Frequency. Yearly and Occasionally.

Affected Public. Private Sector (Business or for-profits and Not-for-profit institutions). Number of Respondents. 65,948.

Total Annual Responses. 65,948. Total Annual Hours. 1,187,064.

(For policy questions regarding this collection contact Caroline Gallaher at 410-786-8705.) 2. Type of Information Collection Request. New collection (Request for a new OMB Control Number). Title of Information Collection.

Medicare-Funded GME Residency Positions in accordance with Section 126 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020 (Pub. L. 116-93). Use.

The requirements in this rule were announced in CMS-1752-P (FY22 IPPS). However, the PRA package has been under development until now. The plan, approved by OMB and CM, is to have the 60-day publish and then have CMS-1752-F2 serve as the 30-day notice, with the goal of approval in early January 2022. Section 126 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act (CAA), 2021 (Pub.

L. 116-93), enacted December 20, 2020, included a key provision affecting Medicare payments for Graduate Medical Education (GME). Section 126(a) of the CAA amended section 1886(h) of the Act by adding a new section 1886(h)(9) requiring the distribution of additional residency positions (slots) to qualifying hospitals. Section 1886(h)(9)(A) makes an additional 1,000 Medicare funded residency slots available to be phased in beginning in FY 2023 until the aggregate number of 1,000 full-time equivalent residency positions are distributed.

This approval request is for CMS to receive electronic applications for Medicare-Funded GME Residency Positions submitted in accordance with Section 126 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021. The electronic applications will be submitted by the applicants in CMS' new Medicare Electronic Application Request Information SystemTM (MEARISTM). There is no existing, hard copy version of the application. The applications will provide CMS with the critical information necessary for CMS to process and score the applications in accordance with the policies finalized in the upcoming final rule to determine the disbursement of the slots and to announce the awardees by the January 31, 2023 required statutory deadline.

Form Number. CMS-10790 (OMB control number. 0938-NEW). Frequency.

Yearly. Affected Public. Private sector (Business or other for-profits and Not-for-profit institutions), State, Local, or Tribal Governments. Number of Respondents.

1,325. Total Annual Responses. 1,325. Total Annual Hours.

10,600. (For policy questions regarding this collection contact Noel Manlove at 410-786-5161.) 3. Type of Information Collection Request. Revision of a currently approved collection.

Title of Information Collection. Cooperative Agreement to Support Navigators in Federally-facilitated Exchanges. Use. Section 1311(i) of the PPACA requires Exchanges to establish a Navigator grant program under which it awards grants to eligible individuals and entities (as described in Section 1311(i)(2) of the PPACA and 45 CFR 155.210(a) and (c)) applying to serve consumers in States with a FFE.

Navigators assist consumers by providing education about and facilitating selection of qualified health plans (QHPs) within the Exchanges, as well as other required duties. Entities and individuals cannot serve as federally certified Navigators and carry out the required duties without receiving federal cooperative agreement funding. On July 1, 2021, HHS published the Updating Payment Parameters, Section 1332 Waiver Implementing Regulations, and Improving Health Insurance Markets for 2022 and Beyond Proposed Rule proposed rule. The proposed regulations would amend federal regulations at 45 CFR 155.210(e)(9) to reinstitute the requirement that FFE Navigators provide consumers with information and assistance on access, affordability and certain post-enrollment topics, such Start Printed Page 58666 as the eligibility appeals process, the Exchange-related components of the Premium Tax Credit (PTC) reconciliation process, and the basic concepts and rights of health coverage and how to use it.

Under the Terms and Conditions of the Navigator program cooperative agreements, awardees must provide progress reports on a weekly, monthly, quarterly and annual basis during the cooperative agreement period of performance, and a final report at the end of the period of performance. Awardees will submit their progress reports electronically to CMS staff for evaluation and analysis. The results of this evaluation will provide feedback on the effectiveness of the Navigator program, so that HHS and CMS leadership may evaluate the effectiveness of the program and address any areas that need revisions. CMS will also use the information collected from Navigator grant awardees to inform the public about the availability of application and enrollment assistance services from designated organizations.

Form Number. CMS-10463 (OMB control number. 0938-1215). Frequency.

Annually, Monthly, Quarterly, Weekly. Affected Public. Private sector. Number of Respondents.

100. Total Annual Responses. 5,200. Total Annual Hours.

529,000. (For questions regarding this collection contact Gian Johnson at 301-492-4323.) Start Signature Dated. October 19, 2021. William N.

Parham, III, Director, Paperwork Reduction Staff, Office of Strategic Operations and Regulatory Affairs. End Signature End Supplemental Information [FR Doc. 2021-23107 Filed 10-21-21. 8:45 am]BILLING CODE 4120-01-PStart Preamble Start Printed Page 58019 Centers for Medicare &.

Medicaid Services (CMS), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Final rule. Correction and correcting amendment. This document corrects technical and typographical errors in the final rule that appeared in the August 13, 2021, issue of the Federal Register titled “Medicare Program.

Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2022 Rates. Quality Programs and Medicare Promoting Interoperability Program Requirements for Eligible Hospitals and Critical Access Hospitals. Changes to Medicaid Provider Enrollment. And Changes to the Medicare Shared Savings Program.”   Effective date.

The final rule corrections and correcting amendment are effective on October 19, 2021. Applicability date. The final rule corrections and correcting amendment are applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2021. Start Further Info Donald Thompson, (410) 786-4487, and Michele Hudson, (410) 786-4487, Operating Prospective Payment, Wage Index, Hospital Geographic Reclassifications, Medicare Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) Payment Adjustment, Graduate Medical Education, and Critical Access Hospital (CAH) Issues.

Mady Hue, (410) 786-4510, and Andrea Hazeley, (410) 786-3543, MS-DRG Classification Issues. Allison Pompey, (410) 786-2348, New Technology Add-On Payments Issues. Julia Venanzi, julia.venanzi@cms.hhs.gov, Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting and Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Programs. End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information I.

Background In FR Doc. 2021-16519 of August 13, 2021 (86 FR 44774), there were a number of technical and typographical errors that are identified and corrected in this final rule correction and correcting amendment. The final rule corrections and correcting amendment are applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2021, as if they had been included in the document that appeared in the August 13, 2021, Federal Register. II.

Summary of Errors A. Summary of Errors in the Preamble On page 44878, we are correcting an inadvertent error in the reference to the number of technologies for which we proposed to allow a one-time extension of new technology add-on payments for fiscal year (FY) 2022. On page 44889, we are correcting an inadvertent typographical error in the International Classification of Disease, 10th Revision, Procedure Coding System (ICD-10-PCS) procedure code describing the percutaneous endoscopic repair of the esophagus. On page 44960, in the table displaying the Medicare-Severity Diagnosis Related Groups (MS-DRGs) subject to the policy for replaced devices offered without cost or with a credit for FY 2022, we are correcting inadvertent typographical errors in the MS-DRGs describing Hip Replacement with Principal Diagnosis of Hip Fracture with and without MCC, respectively.

On pages 45047, 45048, and 45049, in our discussion of the new technology add-on payments for FY 2022, we are correcting typographical and technical errors in referencing sections of the final rule. On page 45133, we are correcting an error in the maximum new technology add-on payment for a case involving the use of AprevoTM Intervertebral Body Fusion Device. On page 45150, we inadvertently omitted ICD-10-CM codes from the list of diagnosis codes used to identify cases involving the use of the INTERCEPT Fibrinogen Complex that would be eligible for new technology add-on payments. On page 45157, we inadvertently omitted the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes used to identify cases involving the use of FETROJA® for HABP/VABP.

On page 45158, we inadvertently omitted the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes used to identify cases involving the use of RECARBRIOTM for HABP/VABP. On pages 45291, 45293, and 45294, in three tables that display previously established, newly updated, and estimated performance standards for measures included in the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program, we are correcting errors in the numerical values for all measures in the Clinical Outcomes Domain that appear in the three tables. On page 45312, in our discussion of payments for indirect and direct graduate medical education costs and Intern and Resident Information System (IRIS) data, we made a typographical error in our response to a comment. On page 45386, we made an inadvertent typographical error in our discussion of the Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting (IQR) Program Severe Hyperglycemia electronic clinical quality measure (eCQM).

On page 45400, in our discussion of the Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting (IQR) Program measures for fiscal year (FY) 2024, we mislabeled the table title and inadvertently included a measure not pertaining to the FY 2024 payment determination along with its corresponding footnote. On page 45404, in our discussion the Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting (IQR) Program, we included a table with the measures for the FY 2025 payment determination. In the notes that immediately followed the table, we made a typographical error in the date associated with the voluntary reporting period for the Hybrid Hospital-Wide All-Cause Risk Standardized Mortality (HWM) measure. B.

Summary of Errors in the Regulations Text On page 45521, in the regulations text for § 413.24(f)(5)(i) introductory text and (f)(5)(i)(A) regarding cost reporting forms and teaching hospitals, we inadvertently omitted revisions that were discussed in the preamble. C. Summary of Errors in the Addendum In the FY 2022 Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems and Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System (IPPS/LTCH PPS) final rule (85 FR 45166), we stated that we excluded the wage data for critical access hospitals (CAHs) as discussed in the FY 2004 IPPS final rule (68 FR 45397 through 45398). That is, any hospital that is designated as a CAH by 7 days prior to the publication of the preliminary wage index public use file (PUF) is excluded from the calculation Start Printed Page 58020 of the wage index.

We inadvertently excluded a hospital that converted to CAH status after January 24, 2021, the cut-off date for CAH exclusion from the FY 2022 wage index. (CMS Certification Number (CCN) 230118) Therefore, we restored the wage data for this hospital and included it in our calculation of the wage index. This correction necessitated the recalculation of the FY 2022 wage index for rural Michigan (rural state code 23), as reflected in Table 3, and affected the final FY 2022 wage index for rural Michigan 23 as well as the rural floor for the State of Michigan. As discussed in this section, the final FY 2022 IPPS wage index is used when determining total payments for purposes of all budget neutrality factors (except for the MS-DRG reclassification and recalibration budget neutrality factor) and the final outlier threshold.

We note, in the final rule, we correctly listed the number of hospitals with CAH status removed from the FY 2022 wage index (86 FR 45166), the number of hospitals used for the FY 2022 wage index (86 FR 45166) and the number of hospital occupational mix surveys used for the FY 2022 wage index (86 FR 45173). Additionally, the FY 2022 national average hourly wage (unadjusted for occupational mix) (86 FR 45172), the FY 2022 occupational mix adjusted national average hourly wage (86 FR 45173), and the FY 2022 national average hourly wages for the occupational mix nursing subcategories (86 FR 45174) listed in the final rule remain unchanged. Because the numbers and values noted previously are correctly stated in the preamble of the final rule and remain unchanged, we do not include any corrections in section IV.A. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment.

We made an inadvertent error in the Medicare Geographic Classification Review Board (MGCRB) reclassification status of one hospital in the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule. Specifically, CCN 360259 is incorrectly listed in Table 2 as reclassified to CBSA 19124. The correct reclassification area is to its geographic “home” of CBSA 45780. This correction necessitated the recalculation of the FY 2022 wage index for CBSA 19124 and affected the final FY 2022 wage index with reclassification.

The final FY 2022 IPPS wage index with reclassification is used when determining total payments for purposes of all budget neutrality factors (except for the MS-DRG reclassification and recalibration budget neutrality factor and the wage index budget neutrality adjustment factor) and the final outlier threshold. As discussed further in section II.E. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, we made updates to the calculation of Factor 3 of the uncompensated care payment methodology to reflect updated information on hospital mergers received in response to the final rule and made corrections for report upload errors. Factor 3 determines the total amount of the uncompensated care payment a hospital is eligible to receive for a fiscal year.

This hospital-specific payment amount is then used to calculate the amount of the interim uncompensated care payments a hospital receives per discharge. Per discharge uncompensated care payments are included when determining total payments for purposes of all of the budget neutrality factors and the final outlier threshold. As a result, the revisions made to the calculation of Factor 3 to address additional merger information and report upload errors directly affected the calculation of total payments and required the recalculation of all the budget neutrality factors and the final outlier threshold. Due to the correction of the combination of errors that are discussed previously (correcting the number of hospitals with CAH status, the correction to the MGCRB reclassification status of one hospital, and the revisions to Factor 3 of the uncompensated care payment methodology), we recalculated all IPPS budget neutrality adjustment factors, the fixed-loss cost threshold, the final wage indexes (and geographic adjustment factors (GAFs)), the national operating standardized amounts and capital Federal rate.

We note that the fixed-loss cost threshold was unchanged after these recalculations. Therefore, we made conforming changes to the following. On page 45532, the table titled “Summary of FY 2022 Budget Neutrality Factors”. On page 45537, the estimated total Federal capital payments and the estimated capital outlier payments.

On pages 45542 and 45543, the calculation of the outlier fixed-loss cost threshold, total operating Federal payments, total operating outlier payments, the outlier adjustment to the capital Federal rate and the related discussion of the percentage estimates of operating and capital outlier payments. On page 45545, the table titled “Changes from FY 2021 Standardized Amounts to the FY 2022 Standardized Amounts”. On pages 45553 through 45554, in our discussion of the determination of the Federal hospital inpatient capital related prospective payment rate update, due to the recalculation of the GAFs, we have made conforming corrections to the capital Federal rate. As a result of these changes, we also made conforming corrections in the table showing the comparison of factors and adjustments for the FY 2021 capital Federal rate and FY 2022 capital Federal rate.

As we noted in the final rule, the capital Federal rate is calculated using unrounded budget neutrality and outlier adjustment factors. The unrounded GAF/DRG budget neutrality factor, the unrounded Quartile/Cap budget neutrality factor, and the unrounded outlier adjustment to the capital Federal rate were revised because of these errors. However, after rounding these factors to 4 decimal places as displayed in the final rule, the rounded factors were unchanged from the final rule. On pages 45570 and 45571, we are making conforming corrections to the national adjusted operating standardized amounts and capital standard Federal payment rate (which also include the rates payable to hospitals located in Puerto Rico) in Tables 1A, 1B, 1C, and 1D as a result of the conforming corrections to certain budget neutrality factors, as previously described.

D. Summary of Errors in the Appendices On pages 45576 through 45580, 45582 through 45583, and 45598 through 45600, in our regulatory impact analyses, we have made conforming corrections to the factors, values, and tables and accompanying discussion of the changes in operating and capital IPPS payments for FY 2022 and the effects of certain IPPS budget neutrality factors as a result of the technical errors that lead to changes in our calculation of the operating and capital IPPS budget neutrality factors, outlier threshold, final wage indexes, operating standardized amounts, and capital Federal rate (as described in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment). These conforming corrections include changes to the following.

On pages 45576 through 45578, the table titled “Table I—Impact Analysis of Changes to the IPPS for Operating Costs for FY 2022”. On pages 45582 and 45583, the table titled “Table II—Impact Analysis of Changes for FY 2022 Acute Care Hospital Operating Prospective Payment System (Payments per discharge)”. • On pages 45599 and 45600, the table titled “Table III—Comparison of Start Printed Page 58021 Total Payments per Case [FY 2021 Payments Compared to FY 2022 Payments]”. On pages 45584 and 45585 we are correcting the maximum new-technology add-on payment for a case involving the use of Fetroja, Recarbrio, Tecartus, and Abecma and related information in the untitled tables as well as making conforming corrections to the total estimated FY 2022 payments in the accompanying discussion of applications approved or conditionally approved for new technology add-on payments.

On pages 45587 through 45589, we are correcting the discussion of the “Effects of the Changes to Medicare DSH and Uncompensated Care Payments for FY 2022” for purposes of the Regulatory Impact Analysis in Appendix A of the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule, including the table titled “Modeled Uncompensated Care Payments for Estimated FY 2022 DSHs by Hospital Type. Uncompensated Care Payments ($ in Millions)*—from FY 2021 to FY 2022”, in light of the corrections discussed in section II.E. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment. On pages 45610 and 45611, we are making conforming corrections to the estimated expenditures under the IPPS as a result of the corrections to the maximum new technology add-on payment for a case involving the use of AprevoTM Intervertebral Body Fusion Device, Fetroja, Recarbrio, Abecma, and Tecartus as described in this section and in section II.A.

Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment. E. Summary of Errors in and Corrections to Files and Tables Posted on the CMS Website We are correcting the errors in the following IPPS tables that are listed on pages 45569 and 45570 of the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule and are available on the internet on the CMS website at https://www.cms.gov/​Medicare/​Medicare-Fee-for-Service-Payment/​AcuteInpatientPPS/​index.html. The tables that are available on the internet have been updated to reflect the revisions discussed in this final rule correction and correcting amendment.

Table 2—Case-Mix Index and Wage Index Table by CCN-FY 2022 Final Rule. As discussed in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, we inadvertently excluded a hospital that converted to CAH status after January 24, 2021, the cut-off date for CAH exclusion from the FY 2022 wage index. (CMS Certification Number (CCN) 230118).

Therefore, we restored provider 230118 to the table. Also, as discussed in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, CCN 360259 is incorrectly listed as reclassified to CBSA 19124. The correct reclassification area is to its geographic “home” of CBSA 45780.

In this table, we are correcting the columns titled “Wage Index Payment CBSA” and “MGCRB Reclass” to accurately reflect its reclassification to CBSA 45780. This correction necessitated the recalculation of the FY 2022 wage index for CBSA 19124. As also discussed later in this section, because the wage indexes are one of the inputs used to determine the out-migration adjustment, some of the out-migration adjustments changed. Therefore, we are making corresponding changes to the affected values.

Table 3.—Wage Index Table by CBSA—FY 2022 Final Rule. As discussed in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, we inadvertently excluded a hospital that converted to CAH status after January 24, 2021, the cut-off date for CAH exclusion from the FY 2022 wage index. (CMS Certification Number (CCN) 230118).

Therefore, we recalculated the wage index for rural Michigan (rural state code 23), as reflected in Table 3, as well as the rural floor for the State of Michigan. Also, as discussed in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, CCN 360259 is incorrectly listed as reclassified to CBSA 19124. The correct reclassification area is to its geographic “home” of CBSA 45780.

In this table, we are correcting the values that changed as a result of these corrections as well as any corresponding changes. Table 4A.—List of Counties Eligible for the Out-Migration Adjustment under Section 1886(d)(13) of the Act—FY 2022 Final Rule. As discussed in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, we inadvertently excluded a hospital that converted to CAH status after January 24, 2021, the cut-off date for CAH exclusion from the FY 2022 wage index.

(CMS Certification Number (CCN) 230118). Also, as discussed in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, CCN 360259 is incorrectly listed as reclassified to CBSA 19124. The correct reclassification area is to its geographic “home” of CBSA 45780.

As a result, as discussed previously, we are making changes to the FY 2022 wage indexes. Because the wage indexes are one of the inputs used to determine the out-migration adjustment, some of the out-migration adjustments changed. Therefore, we are making corresponding changes to some of the out-migration adjustments listed in Table 4A. Table 6B.—New Procedure Codes—FY 2022.

We are correcting this table to reflect the assignment of procedure codes XW033A7 (Introduction of ciltacabtagene autoleucel into peripheral vein, percutaneous approach, new technology group 7) and XW043A7 (Introduction of ciltacabtagene autoleucel into central vein, percutaneous approach, new technology group 7) to Pre-MDC MS-DRG 018 (Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-cell and Other Immunotherapies). Table 6B inadvertently omitted Pre-MDC MS-DRG 018 in Column E (MS-DRG) for assignment of these codes. Effective with discharges on and after April 1, 2022, conforming changes will be reflected in the Version 39.1 ICD-10 MS-DRG Definitions Manual and ICD-10 MS-DRG Grouper and Medicare Code Editor software. Table 6P.—ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS Codes for MS-DRG Changes—FY 2022.

We are correcting Table 6P.1d associated with the final rule to reflect three procedure codes submitted by the requestor that were inadvertently omitted, resulting in 79 procedure codes listed instead of 82 procedure codes as indicated in the final rule (see pages 44808 and 44809). Table 18.—Final FY 2022 Medicare DSH Uncompensated Care Payment Factor 3. For the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule, we published a list of hospitals that we identified to be subsection (d) hospitals and subsection (d) Puerto Rico hospitals projected to be eligible to receive interim uncompensated care payments for FY 2022. As stated in the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule (86 FR 45249), we allowed the public an additional period after the issuance of the final rule to review and submit comments on the accuracy of the list of mergers that we identified in the final rule.

Based on the comments received during this additional period, we are updating this table to reflect the merger information received in response to the final rule and to revise the Factor 3 calculations for purposes of determining uncompensated care payments for the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule. We are revising Factor 3 for all hospitals to reflect the updated merger information received in response to the final rule. We are also revising the amount of the total uncompensated care payment calculated for each DSH eligible hospital. The total uncompensated care payment that a hospital receives is used to calculate the amount of the interim uncompensated care payments the hospital receives per discharge.

Start Printed Page 58022 accordingly, we have also revised these amounts for all DSH eligible hospitals. These corrections will be reflected in Table 18 and the Medicare DSH Supplemental Data File. Per discharge uncompensated care payments are included when determining total payments for purposes of all of the budget neutrality factors and the final outlier threshold. As a result, these corrections to uncompensated care payments required the recalculation of all the budget neutrality factors as well as the outlier fixed-loss cost threshold.

We note that the fixed-loss cost threshold was unchanged after these recalculations. In section IV.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, we have made corresponding revisions to the discussion of the “Effects of the Changes to Medicare DSH and Uncompensated Care Payments for FY 2022” for purposes of the Regulatory Impact Analysis in Appendix A of the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule to reflect the corrections discussed previously and to correct minor typographical errors. The files that are available on the internet have been updated to reflect the corrections discussed in this final rule correction and correcting amendment.

In addition, we are correcting the inadvertent omission of the following 32 ICD-10-PCS codes describing percutaneous cardiovascular procedures involving one, two, three or four arteries from the GROUPER logic for MS-DRG 246 (Percutaneous Cardiovascular Procedures with Drug-Eluting Stent with MCC or 4+ Arteries or Stents) and MS-DRG 248 (Percutaneous Cardiovascular Procedures with Non-Drug-Eluting Stent with MCC or 4+ Arteries or Stents). ICD-10-PCS codeDescription02703Z6Dilation of coronary artery, one artery, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02703ZZDilation of coronary artery, one artery, percutaneous approach.02704Z6Dilation of coronary artery, one artery, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02704ZZDilation of coronary artery, one artery, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C03Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, one artery, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02C03ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, one artery, percutaneous approach.02C04Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, one artery, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C04ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, one artery, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02713Z6Dilation of coronary artery, two arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02713ZZDilation of coronary artery, two arteries, percutaneous approach.02714Z6Dilation of coronary artery, two arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02714ZZDilation of coronary artery, two arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C13Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, two arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02C13ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, two arteries, percutaneous approach.02C14Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, two arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C14ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, two arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02723Z6Dilation of coronary artery, three arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02723ZZDilation of coronary artery, three arteries, percutaneous approach.02724Z6Dilation of coronary artery, three arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02724ZZDilation of coronary artery, three arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C23Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, three arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02C23ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, three arteries, percutaneous approach.02C24Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, three arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C24ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, three arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02733Z6Dilation of coronary artery, four or more arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02733ZZDilation of coronary artery, four or more arteries, percutaneous approach.02734Z6Dilation of coronary artery, four or more arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02734ZZDilation of coronary artery, four or more arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C33Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, four or more arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02C33ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, four or more arteries, percutaneous approach.02C34Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, four or more arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C34ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, four or more arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach. We have corrected the ICD-10 MS-DRG Definitions Manual Version 39 and the ICD-10 MS-DRG GROUPER and MCE Version 39 Software to correctly reflect the inclusion of these codes in the arterial logic lists for MS-DRGs 246 and 248 for FY 2022. III.

Waiver of Proposed Rulemaking and Delay in Effective Date Under 5 U.S.C. 553(b) of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA), the agency is required to publish a notice of the proposed rulemaking in the Federal Register before the provisions of a rule take effect. Similarly, section 1871(b)(1) of the Act requires the Secretary to provide for notice of the proposed rulemaking in the Federal Register and provide a period of not less than 60 days for public comment. In addition, section 553(d) of the APA, and section 1871(e)(1)(B)(i) of the Act mandate a 30-day delay in effective date after issuance or publication of a rule.

Sections 553(b)(B) and 553(d)(3) of the APA provide for exceptions from the notice and comment and delay in effective date APA requirements. In cases in which these exceptions apply, sections 1871(b)(2)(C) and 1871(e)(1)(B)(ii) of the Act provide exceptions from the notice and 60-day comment period and delay in effective date requirements of the Act as well. Section 553(b)(B) of the APA and section 1871(b)(2)(C) of the Act authorize an agency to dispense with normal rulemaking requirements for good cause if the agency makes a finding that the notice and comment process are impracticable, unnecessary, or contrary to the public interest. In addition, both section 553(d)(3) of the APA and section 1871(e)(1)(B)(ii) of the Act allow the agency to avoid the 30-day delay in effective date where such delay is contrary to the public interest and an agency includes a statement of support.

We believe that this final rule correction and correcting amendment does not constitute a rule that would be subject to the notice and comment or Start Printed Page 58023 delayed effective date requirements. This document corrects technical and typographical errors in the preamble, regulations text, addendum, payment rates, tables, and appendices included or referenced in the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule, but does not make substantive changes to the policies or payment methodologies that were adopted in the final rule. As a result, this final rule correction and correcting amendment is intended to ensure that the information in the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule accurately reflects the policies adopted in that document. In addition, even if this were a rule to which the notice and comment procedures and delayed effective date requirements applied, we find that there is good cause to waive such requirements.

Undertaking further notice and comment procedures to incorporate the corrections in this document into the final rule or delaying the effective date would be contrary to the public interest because it is in the public's interest for providers to receive appropriate payments in as timely a manner as possible, and to ensure that the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule accurately reflects our policies. Furthermore, such procedures would be unnecessary, as we are not altering our payment methodologies or policies, but rather, we are simply implementing correctly the methodologies and policies that we previously proposed, requested comment on, and subsequently finalized. This final rule correction and correcting amendment is intended solely to ensure that the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule accurately reflects these payment methodologies and policies. Therefore, we believe we have good cause to waive the notice and comment and effective date requirements.

Moreover, even if these corrections were considered to be retroactive rulemaking, they would be authorized under section 1871(e)(1)(A)(ii) of the Act, which permits the Secretary to issue a rule for the Medicare program with retroactive effect if the failure to do so would be contrary to the public interest. As we have explained previously, we believe it would be contrary to the public interest not to implement the corrections in this final rule correction and correcting amendment because it is in the public's interest for providers to receive appropriate payments in as timely a manner as possible, and to ensure that the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule accurately reflects our policies. IV. Correction of Errors In FR Doc.

2021-16519 of August 13, 2021 (86 FR 44774), we are making the following corrections. A. Correction of Errors in the Preamble 1. On page 44878, second column, last paragraph, line 10, “15 technologies” is corrected to read “technologies.” 2.

On page 44889, lower two-thirds of the page, third column, partial paragraph, line 10, the procedure code “0DQ540ZZ” is corrected to read “0DQ54ZZ.” 3. On page 44960, in the untitled table, last 2 lines are corrected to read as follows. MDCMS-DRGMS-DRG title *         *         *         *         *         *         *08521Hip Replacement with Principal Diagnosis of Hip Fracture with MCC.08522Hip Replacement with Principal Diagnosis of Hip Fracture without MCC. 4.

On page 45047. A. Second column, first full paragraph, lines 21 through 24, the sentence “We summarize comments related to this comment solicitation and provide our responses as well as our finalized policy in section XXX of this final rule.” is corrected to read “We summarize comments related to this comment solicitation and provide our responses in section II.F.7. Of the preamble of this final rule.”.

B. Third column, first full paragraph, line 28, the reference “section XXX” is corrected to read “section II.F.8.”. 5. On page 45048, second column, second full paragraph, lines 20 through 24, the sentence “We summarize comments related to this comment solicitation and provide our responses as well as our finalized policy in section XXX of this final rule.” is corrected to read “We summarize comments related to this comment solicitation and provide our responses in section II.F.7.

Of the preamble of this final rule.”. 6. On page 45049. A.

Second column. (1) First full paragraph, line 12, the reference, “section XXX of this final rule” is corrected to read “section II.F.8. Of the preamble of this final rule”. (2) Second full paragraph, lines 1 and 2, the reference, “section XXX of this final rule” is corrected to read “section II.F.7.

J95.851 (Ventilator associated pneumonia) and one of the following. B96.1 (Klebsiella pneumoniae [K. Pneumoniae] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.20 (Unspecified Escherichia coli [E. Coli] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.21 (Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E.

Coli] [STEC] O157 as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.22 (Other specified Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E. Coli] [STEC] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.23 (Unspecified Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E. Coli] [STEC] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere, B96.29 (Other Escherichia coli [E. Coli] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.3 (Hemophilus influenzae [H.

Influenzae] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere, B96.5 (Pseudomonas (aeruginosa) (mallei) (pseudomallei) as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), or B96.89 (Other specified bacterial agents as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere) for VABP.” 10. On page 45158, third column, first partial paragraph, last line the phrase, “technology group 5).” is corrected to read “technology group 5) in combination with the following ICD-10-CM codes. Y95 (Nosocomial condition) and one of the following. J14.0 (Pneumonia due to Hemophilus influenzae) J15.0 (Pneumonia due to Klebsiella pneumoniae), J15.1 (Pneumonia due to Pseudomonas), J15.5 (Pneumonia due to Escherichia coli), J15.6 (Pneumonia due to other Gram-negative bacteria), or J15.8 (Pneumonia due to other specified bacteria) for HABP and ICD10-PCS codes.

XW033A6 (Introduction of cefiderocol antinfective into peripheral vein, percutaneous approach, new technology group 6) or XW043A6 (Introduction of cefiderocol anti-infective into central vein, percutaneous approach, new technology group 6) in combination with the following ICD-10-CM codes. J95.851 (Ventilator associated pneumonia) and one of the following. B96.1 (Klebsiella pneumoniae [K. Pneumoniae] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.20 (Unspecified Escherichia coli [E.

Coli] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.21 (Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E. Coli] Start Printed Page 58024 [STEC] O157 as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.22 (Other specified Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E. Coli] [STEC] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.23 (Unspecified Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E. Coli] [STEC] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere, B96.29 (Other Escherichia coli [E.

Coli] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.3 (Hemophilus influenzae [H. Influenzae] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere, B96.5 (Pseudomonas (aeruginosa) (mallei)(pseudomallei) as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), or B96.89 (Other specified bacterial agents as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere) for VABP.” 11. On page 45291, middle of the page, the table titled “Table V.H-11. Previously Established and Newly Updated Performance Standards for the FY 2024 Program Year” is corrected to read as follows.

Table V.H-11—Previously Established and Estimated Performance Standards for the FY 2024 Program YearMeasure short nameAchievement thresholdBenchmarkClinical Outcomes DomainMORT-30-AMI #0.8692470.887868MORT-30-HF #0.8823080.907773MORT-30-PN (updated cohort) #0.8402810.872976MORT-30-COPD #0.9164910.934002MORT-30-CABG #0.9694990.980319COMP-HIP-KNEE * #0.0253960.018159♢  As discussed in section V.H.4.b. Of this final rule, we are finalizing the updates to the FY 2024 baseline periods for measures included in the Person and Community Engagement, Safety, and Efficiency and Cost Reduction domains to use CY 2019. Therefore, the performance standards displayed in this table for the Safety domain measures were calculated using CY 2019 data.* Lower values represent better performance.#  Previously established performance standards. 12.

On page 45293, top of the page, the table titled “V.H-13 Previously Established and Estimated Performance Standards for the FY 2025 Program Year” is corrected to read as follows. Table V.H-13—Previously Established and Estimated Performance Standards for the FY 2025 Program YearMeasure short nameAchievement thresholdBenchmarkClinical Outcomes DomainMORT-30-AMI #0.8726240.889994MORT-30-HF #0.8839900.910344MORT-30-PN (updated cohort) #0.8414750.874425MORT-30-COPD #0.9151270.932236MORT-30-CABG #0.9701000.979775COMP-HIP-KNEE * #0.0253320.017946* Lower values represent better performance.#  Previously established performance standards. 13. On page 45294, top of page, the table titled “V.H-14 Previously Established and Estimated Performance Standards for the FY 2026 Program Year” is corrected to read as follows.

Table V.H-14—Previously Established and Estimated Performance Standards for the FY 2026 Program YearMeasure short nameAchievement thresholdBenchmarkClinical Outcomes DomainMORT-30-AMI #0.8744260.890687MORT-30-HF #0.8859490.912874MORT-30-PN (updated cohort) #0.8433690.877097MORT-30-COPD #0.9146910.932157MORT-30-CABG #0.9705680.980473COMP-HIP-KNEE * #0.0240190.016873* Lower values represent better performance. Start Printed Page 58025#  Previously established performance standards. 14. On page 45312, second column, first full paragraph, lines 7 through 9, the phrase “rejection of the cost report if the submitted IRIS GME and IME FTEs do match” is corrected to read “rejection of the cost report if the submitted IRIS GME and IME FTEs do not match”.

15. On page 45386, third column, first full paragraph, line 12, the phrase “mellitus and who either” is corrected to read “mellitus, who”. 16. On page 45400, top of the page, the table titled “Measures for the FY 2024 Payment Determination and Subsequent Years”, is corrected by— a.

Correcting the title to read “Measures for the FY 2023 Payment Determination and Subsequent Years”. B. Removing the heading “Claims and Electronic Data Measures” and the entry “Hybrid HWR**” (rows 20 and 21). C.

Following the table, lines 3 through 8, removing the second table note. 17. On page 45404, bottom of the page, after the table titled “Measures for the FY 2025 Payment Determination and Subsequent Years”, in the third note to the table, line 10, the parenthetical phrase “(July 1, 2023-June 30, 2023)” is corrected to read “(July 1, 2022-June 30, 2023)”. B.

Correction of Errors in the Addendum 1. On page 45532, bottom of the page, the table titled “Summary of FY 2022 Budget Neutrality Factors” is corrected to read as follows. Summary of FY 2022 Budget Neutrality FactorsMS-DRG Reclassification and Recalibration Budget Neutrality Factor1.000107Wage Index Budget Neutrality Factor1.000715Reclassification Budget Neutrality Factor0.986741*Rural Floor Budget Neutrality Factor0.992868Rural Demonstration Budget Neutrality Factor0.999361Low Wage Index Hospital Policy Budget Neutrality Factor0.998029Transition Budget Neutrality Factor0.999859* The rural floor budget neutrality factor is applied to the national wage indexes while the rest of the budget neutrality adjustments are applied to the standardized amounts. 2.

On page 45537, first column, first full paragraph, lines 4 through 10, the parenthetical phrase “(estimated capital outlier payments of $ 430,689,396 divided by (estimated capital outlier payments of $430,689,396 plus the estimated total capital Federal payment of $7,676,990,253)).” is corrected to read “(estimated capital outlier payments of $430,698,533 divided by (estimated capital outlier payments of $430,698,533 plus the estimated total capital Federal payment of $7,676,964,386)).”. 3. On page 45542, third column, last paragraph, lines 23 and 24, the figure “$5,326,356,951” is corrected to read “$5,326,379,560”. 4.

On page 45543. A. Top of the page, first column, first partial paragraph. (1) Line 1, the figure “$100,164,666,975” is corrected to read “$100,165,281,272”.

(2) Line 17, the figure “$31,108” is corrected to read “$31,109”. B. Middle of the page, the untitled table is corrected to read as follows. €ƒOperating standardized amountsCapital Federal rate *National0.9490.947078* The adjustment factor for the capital Federal rate includes an adjustment to the estimated percentage of FY 2022 capital outlier payments for capital outlier reconciliation, as discussed previously and in section III.

A. 2 in the Addendum of this final rule. 5. On page 45545, the table titled “CHANGES FROM FY 2021 STANDARDIZED AMOUNTS TO THE FY 2022 STANDARDIZED AMOUNTS” is corrected to read as follows.

Start Printed Page 58026 6. On page 45553, second column, last paragraph, line 9, the figure “$472.60” is corrected to read “$472.59”. 7. On page 45554, top of the page, in the table titled “COMPARISON OF FACTORS AND ADJUSTMENTS.

FY 2021 CAPITAL FEDERAL RATE AND THE FY 2022 CAPITAL FEDERAL RATE”, the list entry (row 5) is corrected to read as follows. Comparison of Factors and Adjustments. FY 2021 Capital Federal Rate and the FY 2022 Capital Federal Rate FY 2021FY 2022ChangePercent change *         *         *         *         *         *         *Capital Federal Rate$466.21$472.591.01374  1.37 8. On page 45570.

A. The table titled “TABLE 1A.—NATIONAL ADJUSTED OPERATING STANDARDIZED AMOUNTS, LABOR/NONLABOR (67.6 PERCENT LABOR SHARE/32.4 PERCENT NONLABOR SHARE IF WAGE INDEX IS GREATER THAN 1)—FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows. Table 1A—National Adjusted Operating Standardized Amounts, Labor/Nonlabor (67.6 Percent Labor Share/32.4 Percent Nonlabor Share if Wage Index Is Greater Than 1)—FY 2022Hospital submitted quality data and is a meaningful EHR user (update = 2.0 percent)Hospital submitted quality data and is not a meaningful EHR user (update = −0.025 percent)Hospital did not submit quality data and is a meaningful EHR user (update = 1.325 percent)Hospital did not submit quality data and is not a meaningful EHR user (update = −0.7 percent)LaborNonlaborLaborNonlaborLaborNonlaborLaborNonlabor$4,138.24$1,983.41$4,056.08$1,944.03$4,110.85$1,970.28$4,028.70$1,930.91 Start Printed Page 58027 b. The table titled “TABLE 1B.—NATIONAL ADJUSTED OPERATING STANDARDIZED AMOUNTS, LABOR/NONLABOR (62 PERCENT LABOR SHARE/38 PERCENT NONLABOR SHARE IF WAGE INDEX IS LESS THAN OR EQUAL TO 1)—FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows.

Table 1B—National Adjusted Operating Standardized Amounts, Labor/Nonlabor (62 Percent Labor Share/38 Percent Nonlabor Share if Wage Index is Less Than or Equal to 1)—FY 2022Hospital submitted quality data and is a meaningful EHR user (update = 2.0 percent)Hospital submitted quality data and is not a meaningful EHR user (update = −0.025 percent)Hospital did not submit quality data and is a meaningful EHR user (update = 1.325 percent)Hospital did not submit quality data and is not a meaningful EHR user (update = −0.7 percent)LaborNonlaborLaborNonlaborLaborNonlaborLaborNonlabor$3,795.42$2,326.23$3,720.07$2,280.04$3,770.30$2,310.83$3,694.96$2,264.65 9. On page 45571, the top of page. A. The table titled “Table 1C.—ADJUSTED OPERATING STANDARDIZED AMOUNTS FOR HOSPITALS IN PUERTO RICO, LABOR/NONLABOR (NATIONAL.

62 PERCENT LABOR SHARE/38 PERCENT NONLABOR SHARE BECAUSE WAGE INDEX IS LESS THAN OR EQUAL TO 1)—FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows. Table 1C—Adjusted Operating Standardized Amounts for Hospitals in Puerto Rico, Labor/Nonlabor (National. 62 Percent Labor Share/38 Percent Nonlabor Share Because Wage Index Is Less Than or Equal to 1)—FY 2022 Rates if wage index greater than 1Hospital is a meaningful EHR user and wage index less than or equal to 1 (update = 2.0)Hospital is NOT a meaningful EHR user and wage index less than or equal to 1 (update = 1.325)LaborNonlaborLaborNonlaborLaborNonlabor1  NationalNot ApplicableNot Applicable$3,795.42$2,326.23$3,770.30$2,310.831  For FY 2022, there are no CBSAs in Puerto Rico with a national wage index greater than 1. B.

The table titled “TABLE 1D.—CAPITAL STANDARD FEDERAL PAYMENT RATE—FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows. Table 1D—Capital Standard Federal Payment Rate—FY 2022 RateNational$472.59 C. Correction of Errors in the Appendices 1. On pages 45576 through 45578, the table titled “Table I.—Impact Analysis of Changes to the IPPS for Operating Costs for FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows.

Start Printed Page 58028 Start Printed Page 58029 Start Printed Page 58030 2. On page 45579, third column, first paragraph, line 23, the figure “1.000712” is corrected to read “1.000715”. Start Printed Page 58031 3. On page 45580, lower three-fourths of the page, first column, third full paragraph, line 6, the figure “0.986737” is corrected to read “0.986741”.

4. On pages 45582 and 45583, the table titled “Table II.—Impact Analysis of Changes for FY 2022 Acute Care Hospital Operating Prospective Payment System (Payments Per Discharge)” is corrected to read as follows. Table II—Impact Analysis of Changes for FY 2022 Acute Care Hospital Operating Prospective Payment System[Payments per discharge] Number of hospitalsEstimated average FY 2021 payment per dischargeEstimated average FY 2022 payment per dischargeFY 2022 changes (1)(2)(3)(4)All Hospitals3,19513,10913,4482.6By Geographic Location:Urban hospitals2,45913,45413,8002.6Rural hospitals7369,90110,1782.8Bed Size (Urban):0-99 beds63410,72311,0112.7100-199 beds75411,01511,3052.6200-299 beds42712,25112,5512.4300-499 beds42113,49613,8472.6500 or more beds22316,56816,9922.6Bed Size (Rural):0-49 beds3118,5568,9214.350-99 beds2539,4199,6442.4100-149 beds949,78910,0332.5150-199 beds3910,51910,7882.6200 or more beds3911,46511,7842.8Urban by Region:New England11214,85815,2532.7Middle Atlantic30415,43215,8142.5East North Central38112,83813,1502.4West North Central16013,12113,4752.7South Atlantic40211,71012,0492.9East South Central14411,29011,5762.5West South Central36411,80612,0722.3Mountain17213,69814,0542.6Pacific37017,23017,6642.5Puerto Rico508,4918,6371.7Rural by Region:New England1913,99014,4633.4Middle Atlantic509,7369,9882.6East North Central11310,36110,5922.2West North Central8910,63810,9322.8South Atlantic1149,0329,3023East South Central1448,7328,9552.6West South Central1358,2928,5403Mountain4812,13412,3591.9Pacific2413,86514,5885.2By Payment Classification:Urban hospitals1,98312,67313,0032.6Rural areas1,21213,79614,1482.6Teaching Status:Nonteaching2,03110,67710,9632.7Fewer than 100 residents90712,38812,6942.5100 or more residents25718,93819,4372.6Urban DSH:Non-DSH50211,74912,0542.6100 or more beds1,22713,01513,3552.6Less than 100 beds3489,5599,8202.7Rural DSH:SCH26511,90612,2032.5RRC60814,38014,7472.6100 or more beds3012,11512,2981.5Less than 100 beds2157,7788,0253.2Urban teaching and DSH:Both teaching and DSH67914,11614,4832.6Teaching and no DSH7412,82513,1272.4No teaching and DSH89610,85011,1372.6No teaching and no DSH33410,82411,1102.6Special Hospital Types:Start Printed Page 58032RRC52314,47814,8592.6SCH30512,05312,3562.5MDH1539,1699,4042.6SCH and RRC15412,47512,7462.2MDH and RRC2710,62210,8532.2Type of Ownership:Voluntary1,88113,32113,6672.6Proprietary82811,47311,7692.6Government48614,10914,4662.5Medicare Utilization as a Percent of Inpatient Days:0-2564315,15815,5352.525-502,11012,92613,2682.650-6536710,77311,0102.2Over 65508,1328,4313.7FY 2022 Reclassifications by the Medicare Geographic Classification Review Board:All Reclassified Hospitals93413,59213,9442.6Non-Reclassified Hospitals2,26112,77213,1022.6Urban Hospitals Reclassified74914,26114,6192.5Urban Nonreclassified Hospitals1,72312,85113,1872.6Rural Hospitals Reclassified Full Year30010,08710,3412.5Rural Nonreclassified Hospitals Full Year4239,6109,9293.3All Section 401 Reclassified Hospitals53214,96815,3432.5Other Reclassified Hospitals (Section 1886(d)(8)(B))569,1499,4293.1 5. On page 45584, bottom third of the page, third column, partial paragraph.

A. Line 7, the figure “$151 million” is corrected to read “$158 million”. B. Line 10, the figure “$50 million” is corrected to read “$57 million”.

C. Lines 15 and 16, the phrase “for which we are approving new technology add-on payments” is corrected to read “for which we are approving or conditionally approving new technology add-on payments”. 6. On page 45585.

A. Top third of the page. (1) In the untitled table, the third and fourth column headings and the entries at rows 6 and 9 are corrected to read as follows. Technology nameEstimated casesFY 2022 NTAP amountEstimated FY 2022 total impactPathway (QIDP, LPAD, or breakthrough device) *         *         *         *         *         *         *Fetroja (HABP/VABP)379$8,579.84$3,251,759.36QIDP. *         *         *         *         *         *         *Recarbrio (HABP/VABP)9289,576.518,887,001.28QIDP. *         *         *         *         *         *         * (2) Following the first untitled table, second column, partial paragraph, last line, the figure “$498 million” is corrected to read “$514 million”.

B. Middle third of the page, in the untitled table, the third and fourth column headings and the entries at rows 2 and 4 are corrected to read as follows. Technology nameEstimated casesFY 2022 NTAP amountEstimated FY 2022 total impact *         *         *         *         *         *         *Abecma484$272,675.00$131,974,700.00 Start Printed Page 58033*         *         *         *         *         *         *Tecartus15259,350.003,890,250.00 *         *         *         *         *         *         * 7. On pages 45587 and 45588, the table titled “Modeled Uncompensated Care Payments for Estimated FY 2022 DSHs by Hospital Type.

Model Uncompensated Care Payments ($ in Millions)—from FY 2021 to FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows. Start Printed Page 58034 Start Printed Page 58035 8. On page 45588, lower half of the page, beginning with the second column, first full paragraph, line 1 with the phrase “Rural hospitals, in general, are projected to experience” and ending in the third column last paragraph with the phrase “15.22 percent. All” the paragraphs are corrected to read as follows.

€œRural hospitals, in general, are projected to experience larger decreases in uncompensated care payments than their urban counterparts. Overall, rural hospitals are projected to receive a 17.28 percent decrease in uncompensated care payments, which is a greater decrease than the overall hospital average, while urban hospitals are projected to receive a 12.99 percent decrease in uncompensated care payments, similar to the overall hospital average. By bed size, smaller rural hospitals are projected to receive the largest decreases in uncompensated care payments. Rural hospitals with 0-99 beds are projected to receive an 18.97 percent payment decrease, and rural hospitals with 100-249 beds are projected to receive a 15.53 percent decrease.

In contrast, larger rural hospitals with 250+ beds are projected to receive a 14.16 percent payment decrease. Among urban hospitals, the smallest urban hospitals, those with 0-99 and 100-249 beds, are projected to receive a decrease in uncompensated care payments that is greater than the overall hospital average, at 15.49 and 15.50 percent, respectively. In contrast, the largest urban hospitals with 250+ beds are projected to receive a 12.02 percent decrease in uncompensated care payments, which is a smaller decrease than the overall hospital average. By region, rural hospitals are expected to receive larger than average decreases in uncompensated care payments in all Regions, except for rural hospitals in New England, which are projected to receive a decrease of 1.27 percent in uncompensated care payments, and rural hospitals in the East South Central Region, which are projected to receive a smaller than average decrease of 13.01 percent.

Regionally, urban hospitals are projected to receive a more varied range of payment changes. Urban hospitals in the New England, Middle Atlantic, and Pacific Regions are projected to receive larger than average decreases in uncompensated care payments. Urban hospitals in the South Atlantic, East North Central, West North Central, West South Central, and Mountain Regions, as well as hospitals in Puerto Rico are projected to receive smaller than average decreases in uncompensated care payments. Urban hospitals in the East South Central Region are projected to receive an average decrease in uncompensated care payments.

By payment classification, although hospitals in urban areas overall are expected to receive a 12.74 percent decrease in uncompensated care payments, hospitals in large urban areas are expected to see a decrease in uncompensated care payments of 13.52 percent, while hospitals in other urban areas are expected to receive a decrease in uncompensated care payments of 11.21 percent. Rural hospitals are projected to receive the largest decrease of 14.23 percent. Nonteaching hospitals are projected to receive a payment decrease of 13.4 percent, teaching hospitals with fewer than 100 residents are projected to receive a payment decrease of 12.94 percent, and teaching hospitals with 100+ residents have a projected payment decrease of 13.39 percent. All of these decreases closely approximate the overall hospital average.

Proprietary and voluntary hospitals are projected to receive smaller than average decreases of 11.56 and 12.61 percent respectively, while government hospitals are expected to receive a larger payment decrease of 15.21 percent. All”. 9. On page 45589, first column, first partial paragraph, the phrase “hospitals with less than 50 percent Medicare utilization are projected to receive decreases in uncompensated care payments consistent with the overall hospital average percent change, while hospitals with 50-65 percent and greater than 65 percent Medicare utilization are projected to receive larger decreases of 20.79 and 32.81 percent, respectively.” is corrected to read as follows.

€œhospitals with less than 50 percent Medicare utilization are projected to receive decreases in uncompensated care payments consistent with the overall hospital average percent change, while hospitals with 50-65 percent and greater than 65 percent Medicare utilization are projected to receive larger decreases of 20.85 and 32.86 percent, respectively.” Start Printed Page 58036 10. On page 45598, third column, last paragraph, lines 21 through 23, the sentence “The estimated percentage increase for both rural reclassified and nonreclassified hospitals is 1.4 percent.” is corrected to read “The estimated percentage increase for rural reclassified hospitals is 1.3 percent, while the estimated percentage increase for rural nonreclassified hospitals is 1.4 percent.” 11. On pages 45599 and 45600, the table titled “TABLE III.—COMPARISON OF TOTAL PAYMENTS PER CASE [FY 2021 PAYMENTS COMPARED TO FY 2022 PAYMENTS]” is corrected to read as follows. Start Printed Page 58037 Start Printed Page 58038 12.

On page 45610. A. Second column, first partial paragraph. (1) Line 1, the figure “$2.293” is corrected to read “$2.316”.

(2) Line 11, the figure “$0.65” is corrected to read “$0.68”. B. Third column, last full paragraph, last line, the figure “$2.293” is corrected to read “$2.316”. 13.

On page 45611, the table titled “Table V—ACCOUNTING STATEMENT. CLASSIFICATION OF ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES UNDER THE IPPS FROM FY 2021 TO FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows. Start Printed Page 58039 CategoryTransfersAnnualized Monetized Transfers$2.316 billion.From Whom to WhomFederal Government to IPPS Medicare Providers. Start List of Subjects DiseasesHealth facilitiesMedicarePuerto RicoReporting and recordkeeping requirements End List of Subjects As noted in section II.B.

Of the preamble, the Centers for Medicare &. Medicaid Services is making the following correcting amendments to 42 CFR part 413. Start Part End Part Start Amendment Part1. The authority citation for part 413 continues to read as follows.

End Amendment Part Start Authority 42 U.S.C. 1302, 1395d(d), 1395f(b), 1395g, 1395l(a), (i), and (n), 1395x(v), 1395hh, 1395rr, 1395tt, and 1395ww. End Authority Start Amendment Part2. Amend § 413.24 by.

End Amendment Part Start Amendment Parta. In paragraph (f)(5)(i) introductory text, removing the phrase “except as provided in paragraph (f)(5)(i)(E) of this section:” and adding in its place the phrase “except as provided in paragraphs (f)(5)(i)(A)( 2 )( ii ) and (f)(5)(i)(E) of this section:”. And End Amendment Part Start Amendment Partb. Revising paragraph (f)(5)(i)(A).

End Amendment Part The revision reads as follows. Adequate cost data and cost finding. * * * * * (f) * * * (5) * * * (i) * * * (A) Teaching hospitals. For teaching hospitals, the Intern and Resident Information System (IRIS) data.

( 1 ) Data format. For cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2021, the IRIS data must be in the new XML IRIS format. ( 2 ) Resident counts. ( i ) Effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2021, the IRIS data must contain the same total counts of direct GME FTE residents (unweighted and weighted) and IME FTE residents as the total counts of direct GME FTE and IME FTE residents reported in the provider's cost report.

( ii ) For cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2021, and before October 1, 2022, the cost report is not rejected if the requirement in paragraph (f)(5)(i)(A)( 2 )( i ) of this section is not met. * * * * * Start Signature Karuna Seshasai, Executive Secretary to the Department, Department of Health and Human Services. End Signature End Supplemental Information BILLING CODE 4120-01-PBILLING CODE 4120-01-CBILLING CODE 4120-01-PBILLING CODE 4120-01-CBILLING CODE 4120-01-PBILLING CODE 4120-01-CBILLING CODE 4120-01-P[FR Doc. 2021-22724 Filed 10-19-21.

Start Preamble how to get cialis over the counter Centers for visit the website Medicare &. Medicaid Services, Health and Human Services (HHS). Notice. The Centers for Medicare &. Medicaid Services (CMS) is announcing an opportunity for the public to comment on CMS' intention to collect information from the public.

Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (the PRA), federal agencies are required to publish notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information (including each proposed extension or reinstatement of an existing collection of information) and to allow 60 days for public comment on the proposed action. Interested persons are invited to send comments regarding our burden estimates or any other aspect of this collection of information, including the necessity and utility of the proposed information collection for the proper performance of the agency's functions, the accuracy of the estimated burden, ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected, and the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology to minimize the information collection burden. Comments must be received by December 21, 2021. When commenting, please reference the document identifier or OMB control number. To be assured consideration, comments and recommendations must be submitted in any one of the following ways.

1. Electronically. You may send your comments electronically to http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for “Comment or Submission” or “More Search Options” to find the information collection document(s) that are accepting comments. 2.

By regular mail. You may mail written comments to the following address. CMS, Office of Strategic Operations and Regulatory Affairs, Division of Regulations Development, Attention. Document Identifier/OMB Control Number. __, Room C4-26-05, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, Maryland 21244-1850.

Start Printed Page 58665 To obtain copies of a supporting statement and any related forms for the proposed collection(s) summarized in this notice, you may make your request using one of following. 1. Access CMS' website address at website address at https://www.cms.gov/​Regulations-and-Guidance/​Legislation/​PaperworkReductionActof1995/​PRA-Listing.html. Start Further Info William N. Parham at (410) 786-4669.

End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information Contents This notice sets out a summary of the use and burden associated with the following information collections. More detailed information can be found in each collection's supporting statement and associated materials (see ADDRESSES ). CMS-2567 Statement of Deficiency and Plan of Correction CMS-10790 Medicare-Funded GME Residency Positions in accordance with Section 126 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020 (Pub. L. 116-93) CMS-10463 Cooperative Agreement to Support Navigators in Federally-facilitated Exchanges Under the PRA (44 U.S.C.

3501-3520), federal agencies must obtain approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for each collection of information they conduct or sponsor. The term “collection of information” is defined in 44 U.S.C. 3502(3) and 5 CFR 1320.3(c) and includes agency requests or requirements that members of the public submit reports, keep records, or provide information to a third party. Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the PRA requires federal agencies to publish a 60-day notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information, including each proposed extension or reinstatement of an existing collection of information, before submitting the collection to OMB for approval. To comply with this requirement, CMS is publishing this notice.

Information Collection 1. Type of Information Collection Request. Revision of a currently approved collection. Title of Information Collection. Statement of Deficiency and Plan of Correction Use.

The form CMS-2567 is the means by which State and CMS surveyors document findings of compliance or noncompliance (deficiencies) resulting from inspection of Medicare, Medicaid, and Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) laboratories. The form CMS-2567 is the legal, documentary basis for CMS' certification of a facility's compliance or noncompliance with the Medicare/Medicaid Conditions of Participation or Coverage, and the requirements for Nursing Home participation and CLIA certification. In December, 2020, Congress passed the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 (CAA, 2021). Section 407 of CAA, 2021, amended Part A of Title XVIII of the Social Security Act (the Act) at section 1822 establishing hospice program survey and enforcement requirements. This amendment, in part, now requires the Accrediting Organizations (AOs) that accredit hospice programs to include the form CMS-2567 to document the findings of their hospice program surveys beginning on October 1, 2021.

As of June 2021, there are three AOs with CMS-approved hospice accreditation programs. The AOs survey approximately half of the over 5,000 Medicare-certified hospice programs, while the SAs survey the remaining half. Form Numbers. CMS-2567 (OMB control number. 0938-0391).

Frequency. Yearly and Occasionally. Affected Public. Private Sector (Business or for-profits and Not-for-profit institutions). Number of Respondents.

65,948. Total Annual Responses. 65,948. Total Annual Hours. 1,187,064.

(For policy questions regarding this collection contact Caroline Gallaher at 410-786-8705.) 2. Type of Information Collection Request. New collection (Request for a new OMB Control Number). Title of Information Collection. Medicare-Funded GME Residency Positions in accordance with Section 126 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020 (Pub.

L. 116-93). Use. The requirements in this rule were announced in CMS-1752-P (FY22 IPPS). However, the PRA package has been under development until now.

The plan, approved by OMB and CM, is to have the 60-day publish and then have CMS-1752-F2 serve as the 30-day notice, with the goal of approval in early January 2022. Section 126 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act (CAA), 2021 (Pub. L. 116-93), enacted December 20, 2020, included a key provision affecting Medicare payments for Graduate Medical Education (GME). Section 126(a) of the CAA amended section 1886(h) of the Act by adding a new section 1886(h)(9) requiring the distribution of additional residency positions (slots) to qualifying hospitals.

Section 1886(h)(9)(A) makes an additional 1,000 Medicare funded residency slots available to be phased in beginning in FY 2023 until the aggregate number of 1,000 full-time equivalent residency positions are distributed. This approval request is for CMS to receive electronic applications for Medicare-Funded GME Residency Positions submitted in accordance with Section 126 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021. The electronic applications will be submitted by the applicants in CMS' new Medicare Electronic Application Request Information SystemTM (MEARISTM). There is no existing, hard copy version of the application. The applications will provide CMS with the critical information necessary for CMS to process and score the applications in accordance with the policies finalized in the upcoming final rule to determine the disbursement of the slots and to announce the awardees by the January 31, 2023 required statutory deadline.

Form Number. CMS-10790 (OMB control number. 0938-NEW). Frequency. Yearly.

Affected Public. Private sector (Business or other for-profits and Not-for-profit institutions), State, Local, or Tribal Governments. Number of Respondents. 1,325. Total Annual Responses.

1,325. Total Annual Hours. 10,600. (For policy questions regarding this collection contact Noel Manlove at 410-786-5161.) 3. Type of Information Collection Request.

Revision of a currently approved collection. Title of Information Collection. Cooperative Agreement to Support Navigators in Federally-facilitated Exchanges. Use. Section 1311(i) of the PPACA requires Exchanges to establish a Navigator grant program under which it awards grants to eligible individuals and entities (as described in Section 1311(i)(2) of the PPACA and 45 CFR 155.210(a) and (c)) applying to serve consumers in States with a FFE.

Navigators assist consumers by providing education about and facilitating selection of qualified health plans (QHPs) within the Exchanges, as well as other required duties. Entities and individuals cannot serve as federally certified Navigators and carry out the required duties without receiving federal cooperative agreement funding. On July 1, 2021, HHS published the Updating Payment Parameters, Section 1332 Waiver Implementing Regulations, and Improving Health Insurance Markets for 2022 and Beyond Proposed Rule proposed rule. The proposed regulations would amend federal regulations at 45 CFR 155.210(e)(9) to reinstitute the requirement that FFE Navigators provide consumers with information and assistance on access, affordability and certain post-enrollment topics, such Start Printed Page 58666 as the eligibility appeals process, the Exchange-related components of the Premium Tax Credit (PTC) reconciliation process, and the basic concepts and rights of health coverage and how to use it. Under the Terms and Conditions of the Navigator program cooperative agreements, awardees must provide progress reports on a weekly, monthly, quarterly and annual basis during the cooperative agreement period of performance, and a final report at the end of the period of performance.

Awardees will submit their progress reports electronically to CMS staff for evaluation and analysis. The results of this evaluation will provide feedback on the effectiveness of the Navigator program, so that HHS and CMS leadership may evaluate the effectiveness of the program and address any areas that need revisions. CMS will also use the information collected from Navigator grant awardees to inform the public about the availability of application and enrollment assistance services from designated organizations. Form Number. CMS-10463 (OMB control number.

0938-1215). Frequency. Annually, Monthly, Quarterly, Weekly. Affected Public. Private sector.

Number of Respondents. 100. Total Annual Responses. 5,200. Total Annual Hours.

529,000. (For questions regarding this collection contact Gian Johnson at 301-492-4323.) Start Signature Dated. October 19, 2021. William N. Parham, III, Director, Paperwork Reduction Staff, Office of Strategic Operations and Regulatory Affairs.

End Signature End Supplemental Information [FR Doc. 2021-23107 Filed 10-21-21. 8:45 am]BILLING CODE 4120-01-PStart Preamble Start Printed Page 58019 Centers for Medicare &. Medicaid Services (CMS), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Final rule.

Correction and correcting amendment. This document corrects technical and typographical errors in the final rule that appeared in the August 13, 2021, issue of the Federal Register titled “Medicare Program. Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2022 Rates. Quality Programs and Medicare Promoting Interoperability Program Requirements for Eligible Hospitals and Critical Access Hospitals. Changes to Medicaid Provider Enrollment.

And Changes to the Medicare Shared Savings Program.”   Effective date. The final rule corrections and correcting amendment are effective on October 19, 2021. Applicability date. The final rule corrections and correcting amendment are applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2021. Start Further Info Donald Thompson, (410) 786-4487, and Michele Hudson, (410) 786-4487, Operating Prospective Payment, Wage Index, Hospital Geographic Reclassifications, Medicare Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) Payment Adjustment, Graduate Medical Education, and Critical Access Hospital (CAH) Issues.

Mady Hue, (410) 786-4510, and Andrea Hazeley, (410) 786-3543, MS-DRG Classification Issues. Allison Pompey, (410) 786-2348, New Technology Add-On Payments Issues. Julia Venanzi, julia.venanzi@cms.hhs.gov, Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting and Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Programs. End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information I. Background In FR Doc.

2021-16519 of August 13, 2021 (86 FR 44774), there were a number of technical and typographical errors that are identified and corrected in this final rule correction and correcting amendment. The final rule corrections and correcting amendment are applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2021, as if they had been included in the document that appeared in the August 13, 2021, Federal Register. II. Summary of Errors A. Summary of Errors in the Preamble On page 44878, we are correcting an inadvertent error in the reference to the number of technologies for which we proposed to allow a one-time extension of new technology add-on payments for fiscal year (FY) 2022.

On page 44889, we are correcting an inadvertent typographical error in the International Classification of Disease, 10th Revision, Procedure Coding System (ICD-10-PCS) procedure code describing the percutaneous endoscopic repair of the esophagus. On page 44960, in the table displaying the Medicare-Severity Diagnosis Related Groups (MS-DRGs) subject to the policy for replaced devices offered without cost or with a credit for FY 2022, we are correcting inadvertent typographical errors in the MS-DRGs describing Hip Replacement with Principal Diagnosis of Hip Fracture with and without MCC, respectively. On pages 45047, 45048, and 45049, in our discussion of the new technology add-on payments for FY 2022, we are correcting typographical and technical errors in referencing sections of the final rule. On page 45133, we are correcting an error in the maximum new technology add-on payment for a case involving the use of AprevoTM Intervertebral Body Fusion Device. On page 45150, we inadvertently omitted ICD-10-CM codes from the list of diagnosis codes used to identify cases involving the use of the INTERCEPT Fibrinogen Complex that would be eligible for new technology add-on payments.

On page 45157, we inadvertently omitted the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes used to identify cases involving the use of FETROJA® for HABP/VABP. On page 45158, we inadvertently omitted the ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes used to identify cases involving the use of RECARBRIOTM for HABP/VABP. On pages 45291, 45293, and 45294, in three tables that display previously established, newly updated, and estimated performance standards for measures included in the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program, we are correcting errors in the numerical values for all measures in the Clinical Outcomes Domain that appear in the three tables. On page 45312, in our discussion of payments for indirect and direct graduate medical education costs and Intern and Resident Information System (IRIS) data, we made a typographical error in our response to a comment. On page 45386, we made an inadvertent typographical error in our discussion of the Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting (IQR) Program Severe Hyperglycemia electronic clinical quality measure (eCQM).

On page 45400, in our discussion of the Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting (IQR) Program measures for fiscal year (FY) 2024, we mislabeled the table title and inadvertently included a measure not pertaining to the FY 2024 payment determination along with its corresponding footnote. On page 45404, in our discussion the Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting (IQR) Program, we included a table with the measures for the FY 2025 payment determination. In the notes that immediately followed the table, we made a typographical error in the date associated with the voluntary reporting period for the Hybrid Hospital-Wide All-Cause Risk Standardized Mortality (HWM) measure. B. Summary of Errors in the Regulations Text On page 45521, in the regulations text for § 413.24(f)(5)(i) introductory text and (f)(5)(i)(A) regarding cost reporting forms and teaching hospitals, we inadvertently omitted revisions that were discussed in the preamble.

C. Summary of Errors in the Addendum In the FY 2022 Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems and Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System (IPPS/LTCH PPS) final rule (85 FR 45166), we stated that we excluded the wage data for critical access hospitals (CAHs) as discussed in the FY 2004 IPPS final rule (68 FR 45397 through 45398). That is, any hospital that is designated as a CAH by 7 days prior to the publication of the preliminary wage index public use file (PUF) is excluded from the calculation Start Printed Page 58020 of the wage index. We inadvertently excluded a hospital that converted to CAH status after January 24, 2021, the cut-off date for CAH exclusion from the FY 2022 wage index. (CMS Certification Number (CCN) 230118) Therefore, we restored the wage data for this hospital and included it in our calculation of the wage index.

This correction necessitated the recalculation of the FY 2022 wage index for rural Michigan (rural state code 23), as reflected in Table 3, and affected the final FY 2022 wage index for rural Michigan 23 as well as the rural floor for the State of Michigan. As discussed in this section, the final FY 2022 IPPS wage index is used when determining total payments for purposes of all budget neutrality factors (except for the MS-DRG reclassification and recalibration budget neutrality factor) and the final outlier threshold. We note, in the final rule, we correctly listed the number of hospitals with CAH status removed from the FY 2022 wage index (86 FR 45166), the number of hospitals used for the FY 2022 wage index (86 FR 45166) and the number of hospital occupational mix surveys used for the FY 2022 wage index (86 FR 45173). Additionally, the FY 2022 national average hourly wage (unadjusted for occupational mix) (86 FR 45172), the FY 2022 occupational mix adjusted national average hourly wage (86 FR 45173), and the FY 2022 national average hourly wages for the occupational mix nursing subcategories (86 FR 45174) listed in the final rule remain unchanged. Because the numbers and values noted previously are correctly stated in the preamble of the final rule and remain unchanged, we do not include any corrections in section IV.A.

Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment. We made an inadvertent error in the Medicare Geographic Classification Review Board (MGCRB) reclassification status of one hospital in the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule. Specifically, CCN 360259 is incorrectly listed in Table 2 as reclassified to CBSA 19124. The correct reclassification area is to its geographic “home” of CBSA 45780. This correction necessitated the recalculation of the FY 2022 wage index for CBSA 19124 and affected the final FY 2022 wage index with reclassification.

The final FY 2022 IPPS wage index with reclassification is used when determining total payments for purposes of all budget neutrality factors (except for the MS-DRG reclassification and recalibration budget neutrality factor and the wage index budget neutrality adjustment factor) and the final outlier threshold. As discussed further in section II.E. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, we made updates to the calculation of Factor 3 of the uncompensated care payment methodology to reflect updated information on hospital mergers received in response to the final rule and made corrections for report upload errors. Factor 3 determines the total amount of the uncompensated care payment a hospital is eligible to receive for a fiscal year. This hospital-specific payment amount is then used to calculate the amount of the interim uncompensated care payments a hospital receives per discharge.

Per discharge uncompensated care payments are included when determining total payments for purposes of all of the budget neutrality factors and the final outlier threshold. As a result, the revisions made to the calculation of Factor 3 to address additional merger information and report upload errors directly affected the calculation of total payments and required the recalculation of all the budget neutrality factors and the final outlier threshold. Due to the correction of the combination of errors that are discussed previously (correcting the number of hospitals with CAH status, the correction to the MGCRB reclassification status of one hospital, and the revisions to Factor 3 of the uncompensated care payment methodology), we recalculated all IPPS budget neutrality adjustment factors, the fixed-loss cost threshold, the final wage indexes (and geographic adjustment factors (GAFs)), the national operating standardized amounts and capital Federal rate. We note that the fixed-loss cost threshold was unchanged after these recalculations. Therefore, we made conforming changes to the following.

On page 45532, the table titled “Summary of FY 2022 Budget Neutrality Factors”. On page 45537, the estimated total Federal capital payments and the estimated capital outlier payments. On pages 45542 and 45543, the calculation of the outlier fixed-loss cost threshold, total operating Federal payments, total operating outlier payments, the outlier adjustment to the capital Federal rate and the related discussion of the percentage estimates of operating and capital outlier payments. On page 45545, the table titled “Changes from FY 2021 Standardized Amounts to the FY 2022 Standardized Amounts”. On pages 45553 through 45554, in our discussion of the determination of the Federal hospital inpatient capital related prospective payment rate update, due to the recalculation of the GAFs, we have made conforming corrections to the capital Federal rate.

As a result of these changes, we also made conforming corrections in the table showing the comparison of factors and adjustments for the FY 2021 capital Federal rate and FY 2022 capital Federal rate. As we noted in the final rule, the capital Federal rate is calculated using unrounded budget neutrality and outlier adjustment factors. The unrounded GAF/DRG budget neutrality factor, the unrounded Quartile/Cap budget neutrality factor, and the unrounded outlier adjustment to the capital Federal rate were revised because of these errors. However, after rounding these factors to 4 decimal places as displayed in the final rule, the rounded factors were unchanged from the final rule. On pages 45570 and 45571, we are making conforming corrections to the national adjusted operating standardized amounts and capital standard Federal payment rate (which also include the rates payable to hospitals located in Puerto Rico) in Tables 1A, 1B, 1C, and 1D as a result of the conforming corrections to certain budget neutrality factors, as previously described.

D. Summary of Errors in the Appendices On pages 45576 through 45580, 45582 through 45583, and 45598 through 45600, in our regulatory impact analyses, we have made conforming corrections to the factors, values, and tables and accompanying discussion of the changes in operating and capital IPPS payments for FY 2022 and the effects of certain IPPS budget neutrality factors as a result of the technical errors that lead to changes in our calculation of the operating and capital IPPS budget neutrality factors, outlier threshold, final wage indexes, operating standardized amounts, and capital Federal rate (as described in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment). These conforming corrections include changes to the following. On pages 45576 through 45578, the table titled “Table I—Impact Analysis of Changes to the IPPS for Operating Costs for FY 2022”.

On pages 45582 and 45583, the table titled “Table II—Impact Analysis of Changes for FY 2022 Acute Care Hospital Operating Prospective Payment System (Payments per discharge)”. • On pages 45599 and 45600, the table titled “Table III—Comparison of Start Printed Page 58021 Total Payments per Case [FY 2021 Payments Compared to FY 2022 Payments]”. On pages 45584 and 45585 we are correcting the maximum new-technology add-on payment for a case involving the use of Fetroja, Recarbrio, Tecartus, and Abecma and related information in the untitled tables as well as making conforming corrections to the total estimated FY 2022 payments in the accompanying discussion of applications approved or conditionally approved for new technology add-on payments. On pages 45587 through 45589, we are correcting the discussion of the “Effects of the Changes to Medicare DSH and Uncompensated Care Payments for FY 2022” for purposes of the Regulatory Impact Analysis in Appendix A of the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule, including the table titled “Modeled Uncompensated Care Payments for Estimated FY 2022 DSHs by Hospital Type. Uncompensated Care Payments ($ in Millions)*—from FY 2021 to FY 2022”, in light of the corrections discussed in section II.E.

Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment. On pages 45610 and 45611, we are making conforming corrections to the estimated expenditures under the IPPS as a result of the corrections to the maximum new technology add-on payment for a case involving the use of AprevoTM Intervertebral Body Fusion Device, Fetroja, Recarbrio, Abecma, and Tecartus as described in this section and in section II.A. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment. E. Summary of Errors in and Corrections to Files and Tables Posted on the CMS Website We are correcting the errors in the following IPPS tables that are listed on pages 45569 and 45570 of the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule and are available on the internet on the CMS website at https://www.cms.gov/​Medicare/​Medicare-Fee-for-Service-Payment/​AcuteInpatientPPS/​index.html.

The tables that are available on the internet have been updated to reflect the revisions discussed in this final rule correction and correcting amendment. Table 2—Case-Mix Index and Wage Index Table by CCN-FY 2022 Final Rule. As discussed in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, we inadvertently excluded a hospital that converted to CAH status after January 24, 2021, the cut-off date for CAH exclusion from the FY 2022 wage index. (CMS Certification Number (CCN) 230118).

Therefore, we restored provider 230118 to the table. Also, as discussed in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, CCN 360259 is incorrectly listed as reclassified to CBSA 19124. The correct reclassification area is to its geographic “home” of CBSA 45780. In this table, we are correcting the columns titled “Wage Index Payment CBSA” and “MGCRB Reclass” to accurately reflect its reclassification to CBSA 45780.

This correction necessitated the recalculation of the FY 2022 wage index for CBSA 19124. As also discussed later in this section, because the wage indexes are one of the inputs used to determine the out-migration adjustment, some of the out-migration adjustments changed. Therefore, we are making corresponding changes to the affected values. Table 3.—Wage Index Table by CBSA—FY 2022 Final Rule. As discussed in section II.C.

Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, we inadvertently excluded a hospital that converted to CAH status after January 24, 2021, the cut-off date for CAH exclusion from the FY 2022 wage index. (CMS Certification Number (CCN) 230118). Therefore, we recalculated the wage index for rural Michigan (rural state code 23), as reflected in Table 3, as well as the rural floor for the State of Michigan. Also, as discussed in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, CCN 360259 is incorrectly listed as reclassified to CBSA 19124.

The correct reclassification area is to its geographic “home” of CBSA 45780. In this table, we are correcting the values that changed as a result of these corrections as well as any corresponding changes. Table 4A.—List of Counties Eligible for the Out-Migration Adjustment under Section 1886(d)(13) of the Act—FY 2022 Final Rule. As discussed in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, we inadvertently excluded a hospital that converted to CAH status after January 24, 2021, the cut-off date for CAH exclusion from the FY 2022 wage index.

(CMS Certification Number (CCN) 230118). Also, as discussed in section II.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, CCN 360259 is incorrectly listed as reclassified to CBSA 19124. The correct reclassification area is to its geographic “home” of CBSA 45780. As a result, as discussed previously, we are making changes to the FY 2022 wage indexes.

Because the wage indexes are one of the inputs used to determine the out-migration adjustment, some of the out-migration adjustments changed. Therefore, we are making corresponding changes to some of the out-migration adjustments listed in Table 4A. Table 6B.—New Procedure Codes—FY 2022. We are correcting this table to reflect the assignment of procedure codes XW033A7 (Introduction of ciltacabtagene autoleucel into peripheral vein, percutaneous approach, new technology group 7) and XW043A7 (Introduction of ciltacabtagene autoleucel into central http://robertflannagan.com/?p=33 vein, percutaneous approach, new technology group 7) to Pre-MDC MS-DRG 018 (Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-cell and Other Immunotherapies). Table 6B inadvertently omitted Pre-MDC MS-DRG 018 in Column E (MS-DRG) for assignment of these codes.

Effective with discharges on and after April 1, 2022, conforming changes will be reflected in the Version 39.1 ICD-10 MS-DRG Definitions Manual and ICD-10 MS-DRG Grouper and Medicare Code Editor software. Table 6P.—ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS Codes for MS-DRG Changes—FY 2022. We are correcting Table 6P.1d associated with the final rule to reflect three procedure codes submitted by the requestor that were inadvertently omitted, resulting in 79 procedure codes listed instead of 82 procedure codes as indicated in the final rule (see pages 44808 and 44809). Table 18.—Final FY 2022 Medicare DSH Uncompensated Care Payment Factor 3. For the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule, we published a list of hospitals that we identified to be subsection (d) hospitals and subsection (d) Puerto Rico hospitals projected to be eligible to receive interim uncompensated care payments for FY 2022.

As stated in the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule (86 FR 45249), we allowed the public an additional period after the issuance of the final rule to review and submit comments on the accuracy of the list of mergers that we identified in the final rule. Based on the comments received during this additional period, we are updating this table to reflect the merger information received in response to the final rule and to revise the Factor 3 calculations for purposes of determining uncompensated care payments for the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule. We are revising Factor 3 for all hospitals to reflect the updated merger information received in response to the final rule. We are also revising the amount of the total uncompensated care payment calculated for each DSH eligible hospital. The total uncompensated care payment that a hospital receives is used to calculate the amount of the interim uncompensated care payments the hospital receives per discharge.

Start Printed Page 58022 accordingly, we have also revised these amounts for all DSH eligible hospitals. These corrections will be reflected in Table 18 and the Medicare DSH Supplemental Data File. Per discharge uncompensated care payments are included when determining total payments for purposes of all of the budget neutrality factors and the final outlier threshold. As a result, these corrections to uncompensated care payments required the recalculation of all the budget neutrality factors as well as the outlier fixed-loss cost threshold. We note that the fixed-loss cost threshold was unchanged after these recalculations.

In section IV.C. Of this final rule correction and correcting amendment, we have made corresponding revisions to the discussion of the “Effects of the Changes to Medicare DSH and Uncompensated Care Payments for FY 2022” for purposes of the Regulatory Impact Analysis in Appendix A of the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule to reflect the corrections discussed previously and to correct minor typographical errors. The files that are available on the internet have been updated to reflect the corrections discussed in this final rule correction and correcting amendment. In addition, we are correcting the inadvertent omission of the following 32 ICD-10-PCS codes describing percutaneous cardiovascular procedures involving one, two, three or four arteries from the GROUPER logic for MS-DRG 246 (Percutaneous Cardiovascular Procedures with Drug-Eluting Stent with MCC or 4+ Arteries or Stents) and MS-DRG 248 (Percutaneous Cardiovascular Procedures with Non-Drug-Eluting Stent with MCC or 4+ Arteries or Stents). ICD-10-PCS codeDescription02703Z6Dilation of coronary artery, one artery, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02703ZZDilation of coronary artery, one artery, percutaneous approach.02704Z6Dilation of coronary artery, one artery, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02704ZZDilation of coronary artery, one artery, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C03Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, one artery, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02C03ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, one artery, percutaneous approach.02C04Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, one artery, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C04ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, one artery, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02713Z6Dilation of coronary artery, two arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02713ZZDilation of coronary artery, two arteries, percutaneous approach.02714Z6Dilation of coronary artery, two arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02714ZZDilation of coronary artery, two arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C13Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, two arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02C13ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, two arteries, percutaneous approach.02C14Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, two arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C14ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, two arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02723Z6Dilation of coronary artery, three arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02723ZZDilation of coronary artery, three arteries, percutaneous approach.02724Z6Dilation of coronary artery, three arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02724ZZDilation of coronary artery, three arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C23Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, three arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02C23ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, three arteries, percutaneous approach.02C24Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, three arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C24ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, three arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02733Z6Dilation of coronary artery, four or more arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02733ZZDilation of coronary artery, four or more arteries, percutaneous approach.02734Z6Dilation of coronary artery, four or more arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02734ZZDilation of coronary artery, four or more arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C33Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, four or more arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous approach.02C33ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, four or more arteries, percutaneous approach.02C34Z6Extirpation of matter from coronary artery, four or more arteries, bifurcation, percutaneous endoscopic approach.02C34ZZExtirpation of matter from coronary artery, four or more arteries, percutaneous endoscopic approach.

We have corrected the ICD-10 MS-DRG Definitions Manual Version 39 and the ICD-10 MS-DRG GROUPER and MCE Version 39 Software to correctly reflect the inclusion of these codes in the arterial logic lists for MS-DRGs 246 and 248 for FY 2022. III. Waiver of Proposed Rulemaking and Delay in Effective Date Under 5 U.S.C. 553(b) of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA), the agency is required to publish a notice of the proposed rulemaking in the Federal Register before the provisions of a rule take effect. Similarly, section 1871(b)(1) of the Act requires the Secretary to provide for notice of the proposed rulemaking in the Federal Register and provide a period of not less than 60 days for public comment.

In addition, section 553(d) of the APA, and section 1871(e)(1)(B)(i) of the Act mandate a 30-day delay in effective date after issuance or publication of a rule. Sections 553(b)(B) and 553(d)(3) of the APA provide for exceptions from the notice and comment and delay in effective date APA requirements. In cases in which these exceptions apply, sections 1871(b)(2)(C) and 1871(e)(1)(B)(ii) of the Act provide exceptions from the notice and 60-day comment period and delay in effective date requirements of the Act as well. Section 553(b)(B) of the APA and section 1871(b)(2)(C) of the Act authorize an agency to dispense with normal rulemaking requirements for good cause if the agency makes a finding that the notice and comment process are impracticable, unnecessary, or contrary to the public interest. In addition, both section 553(d)(3) of the APA and section 1871(e)(1)(B)(ii) of the Act allow the agency to avoid the 30-day delay in effective date where such delay is contrary to the public interest and an agency includes a statement of support.

We believe that this final rule correction and correcting amendment does not constitute a rule that would be subject to the notice and comment or Start Printed Page 58023 delayed effective date requirements. This document corrects technical and typographical errors in the preamble, regulations text, addendum, payment rates, tables, and appendices included or referenced in the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule, but does not make substantive changes to the policies or payment methodologies that were adopted in the final rule. As a result, this final rule correction and correcting amendment is intended to ensure that the information in the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule accurately reflects the policies adopted in that document. In addition, even if this were a rule to which the notice and comment procedures and delayed effective date requirements applied, we find that there is good cause to waive such requirements. Undertaking further notice and comment procedures to incorporate the corrections in this document into the final rule or delaying the effective date would be contrary to the public interest because it is in the public's interest for providers to receive appropriate payments in as timely a manner as possible, and to ensure that the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule accurately reflects our policies.

Furthermore, such procedures would be unnecessary, as we are not altering our payment methodologies or policies, but rather, we are simply implementing correctly the methodologies and policies that we previously proposed, requested comment on, and subsequently finalized. This final rule correction and correcting amendment is intended solely to ensure that the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule accurately reflects these payment methodologies and policies. Therefore, we believe we have good cause to waive the notice and comment and effective date requirements. Moreover, even if these corrections were considered to be retroactive rulemaking, they would be authorized under section 1871(e)(1)(A)(ii) of the Act, which permits the Secretary to issue a rule for the Medicare program with retroactive effect if the failure to do so would be contrary to the public interest. As we have explained previously, we believe it would be contrary to the public interest not to implement the corrections in this final rule correction and correcting amendment because it is in the public's interest for providers to receive appropriate payments in as timely a manner as possible, and to ensure that the FY 2022 IPPS/LTCH PPS final rule accurately reflects our policies.

IV. Correction of Errors In FR Doc. 2021-16519 of August 13, 2021 (86 FR 44774), we are making the following corrections. A. Correction of Errors in the Preamble 1.

On page 44878, second column, last paragraph, line 10, “15 technologies” is corrected to read “technologies.” 2. On page 44889, lower two-thirds of the page, third column, partial paragraph, line 10, the procedure code “0DQ540ZZ” is corrected to read “0DQ54ZZ.” 3. On page 44960, in the untitled table, last 2 lines are corrected to read as follows. MDCMS-DRGMS-DRG title *         *         *         *         *         *         *08521Hip Replacement with Principal Diagnosis of Hip Fracture with MCC.08522Hip Replacement with Principal Diagnosis of Hip Fracture without MCC. 4.

On page 45047. A. Second column, first full paragraph, lines 21 through 24, the sentence “We summarize comments related to this comment solicitation and provide our responses as well as our finalized policy in section XXX of this final rule.” is corrected to read “We summarize comments related to this comment solicitation and provide our responses in section II.F.7. Of the preamble of this final rule.”. B.

Third column, first full paragraph, line 28, the reference “section XXX” is corrected to read “section II.F.8.”. 5. On page 45048, second column, second full paragraph, lines 20 through 24, the sentence “We summarize comments related to this comment solicitation and provide our responses as well as our finalized policy in section XXX of this final rule.” is corrected to read “We summarize comments related to this comment solicitation and provide our responses in section II.F.7. Of the preamble of this final rule.”. 6.

On page 45049. A. Second column. (1) First full paragraph, line 12, the reference, “section XXX of this final rule” is corrected to read “section II.F.8. Of the preamble of this final rule”.

(2) Second full paragraph, lines 1 and 2, the reference, “section XXX of this final rule” is corrected to read “section II.F.7. J95.851 (Ventilator associated pneumonia) and one of the following. B96.1 (Klebsiella pneumoniae [K. Pneumoniae] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.20 (Unspecified Escherichia coli [E. Coli] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.21 (Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E.

Coli] [STEC] O157 as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.22 (Other specified Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E. Coli] [STEC] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.23 (Unspecified Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E. Coli] [STEC] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere, B96.29 (Other Escherichia coli [E. Coli] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.3 (Hemophilus influenzae [H. Influenzae] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere, B96.5 (Pseudomonas (aeruginosa) (mallei) (pseudomallei) as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), or B96.89 (Other specified bacterial agents as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere) for VABP.” 10.

On page 45158, third column, first partial paragraph, last line the phrase, “technology group 5).” is corrected to read “technology group 5) in combination with the following ICD-10-CM codes. Y95 (Nosocomial condition) and one of the following. J14.0 (Pneumonia due to Hemophilus influenzae) J15.0 (Pneumonia due to Klebsiella pneumoniae), J15.1 (Pneumonia due to Pseudomonas), J15.5 (Pneumonia due to Escherichia coli), J15.6 (Pneumonia due to other Gram-negative bacteria), or J15.8 (Pneumonia due to other specified bacteria) for HABP and ICD10-PCS codes. XW033A6 (Introduction of cefiderocol antinfective into peripheral vein, percutaneous approach, new technology group 6) or XW043A6 (Introduction of cefiderocol anti-infective into central vein, percutaneous approach, new technology group 6) in combination with the following ICD-10-CM codes. J95.851 (Ventilator associated pneumonia) and one of the following.

B96.1 (Klebsiella pneumoniae [K. Pneumoniae] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.20 (Unspecified Escherichia coli [E. Coli] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.21 (Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E. Coli] Start Printed Page 58024 [STEC] O157 as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.22 (Other specified Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E. Coli] [STEC] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.23 (Unspecified Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [E.

Coli] [STEC] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere, B96.29 (Other Escherichia coli [E. Coli] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), B96.3 (Hemophilus influenzae [H. Influenzae] as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere, B96.5 (Pseudomonas (aeruginosa) (mallei)(pseudomallei) as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere), or B96.89 (Other specified bacterial agents as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere) for VABP.” 11. On page 45291, middle of the page, the table titled “Table V.H-11. Previously Established and Newly Updated Performance Standards for the FY 2024 Program Year” is corrected to read as follows.

Table V.H-11—Previously Established and Estimated Performance Standards for the FY 2024 Program YearMeasure short nameAchievement thresholdBenchmarkClinical Outcomes DomainMORT-30-AMI #0.8692470.887868MORT-30-HF #0.8823080.907773MORT-30-PN (updated cohort) #0.8402810.872976MORT-30-COPD #0.9164910.934002MORT-30-CABG #0.9694990.980319COMP-HIP-KNEE * #0.0253960.018159♢  As discussed in section V.H.4.b. Of this final rule, we are finalizing the updates to the FY 2024 baseline periods for measures included in the Person and Community Engagement, Safety, and Efficiency and Cost Reduction domains to use CY 2019. Therefore, the performance standards displayed in this table for the Safety domain measures were calculated using CY 2019 data.* Lower values represent better performance.#  Previously established performance standards. 12. On page 45293, top of the page, the table titled “V.H-13 Previously Established and Estimated Performance Standards for the FY 2025 Program Year” is corrected to read as follows.

Table V.H-13—Previously Established and Estimated Performance Standards for the FY 2025 Program YearMeasure short nameAchievement thresholdBenchmarkClinical Outcomes DomainMORT-30-AMI #0.8726240.889994MORT-30-HF #0.8839900.910344MORT-30-PN (updated cohort) #0.8414750.874425MORT-30-COPD #0.9151270.932236MORT-30-CABG #0.9701000.979775COMP-HIP-KNEE * #0.0253320.017946* Lower values represent better performance.#  Previously established performance standards. 13. On page 45294, top of page, the table titled “V.H-14 Previously Established and Estimated Performance Standards for the FY 2026 Program Year” is corrected to read as follows. Table V.H-14—Previously Established and Estimated Performance Standards for the FY 2026 Program YearMeasure short nameAchievement thresholdBenchmarkClinical Outcomes DomainMORT-30-AMI #0.8744260.890687MORT-30-HF #0.8859490.912874MORT-30-PN (updated cohort) #0.8433690.877097MORT-30-COPD #0.9146910.932157MORT-30-CABG #0.9705680.980473COMP-HIP-KNEE * #0.0240190.016873* Lower values represent better performance. Start Printed Page 58025#  Previously established performance standards.

14. On page 45312, second column, first full paragraph, lines 7 through 9, the phrase “rejection of the cost report if the submitted IRIS GME and IME FTEs do match” is corrected to read “rejection of the cost report if the submitted IRIS GME and IME FTEs do not match”. 15. On page 45386, third column, first full paragraph, line 12, the phrase “mellitus and who either” is corrected to read “mellitus, who”. 16.

On page 45400, top of the page, the table titled “Measures for the FY 2024 Payment Determination and Subsequent Years”, is corrected by— a. Correcting the title to read “Measures for the FY 2023 Payment Determination and Subsequent Years”. B. Removing the heading “Claims and Electronic Data Measures” and the entry “Hybrid HWR**” (rows 20 and 21). C.

Following the table, lines 3 through 8, removing the second table note. 17. On page 45404, bottom of the page, after the table titled “Measures for the FY 2025 Payment Determination and Subsequent Years”, in the third note to the table, line 10, the parenthetical phrase “(July 1, 2023-June 30, 2023)” is corrected to read “(July 1, 2022-June 30, 2023)”. B. Correction of Errors in the Addendum 1.

On page 45532, bottom of the page, the table titled “Summary of FY 2022 Budget Neutrality Factors” is corrected to read as follows. Summary of FY 2022 Budget Neutrality FactorsMS-DRG Reclassification and Recalibration Budget Neutrality Factor1.000107Wage Index Budget Neutrality Factor1.000715Reclassification Budget Neutrality Factor0.986741*Rural Floor Budget Neutrality Factor0.992868Rural Demonstration Budget Neutrality Factor0.999361Low Wage Index Hospital Policy Budget Neutrality Factor0.998029Transition Budget Neutrality Factor0.999859* The rural floor budget neutrality factor is applied to the national wage indexes while the rest of the budget neutrality adjustments are applied to the standardized amounts. 2. On page 45537, first column, first full paragraph, lines 4 through 10, the parenthetical phrase “(estimated capital outlier payments of $ 430,689,396 divided by (estimated capital outlier payments of $430,689,396 plus the estimated total capital Federal payment of $7,676,990,253)).” is corrected to read “(estimated capital outlier payments of $430,698,533 divided by (estimated capital outlier payments of $430,698,533 plus the estimated total capital Federal payment of $7,676,964,386)).”. 3.

On page 45542, third column, last paragraph, lines 23 and 24, the figure “$5,326,356,951” is corrected to read “$5,326,379,560”. 4. On page 45543. A. Top of the page, first column, first partial paragraph.

(1) Line 1, the figure “$100,164,666,975” is corrected to read “$100,165,281,272”. (2) Line 17, the figure “$31,108” is corrected to read “$31,109”. B. Middle of the page, the untitled table is corrected to read as follows. €ƒOperating standardized amountsCapital Federal rate *National0.9490.947078* The adjustment factor for the capital Federal rate includes an adjustment to the estimated percentage of FY 2022 capital outlier payments for capital outlier reconciliation, as discussed previously and in section III.

A. 2 in the Addendum of this final rule. 5. On page 45545, the table titled “CHANGES FROM FY 2021 STANDARDIZED AMOUNTS TO THE FY 2022 STANDARDIZED AMOUNTS” is corrected to read as follows. Start Printed Page 58026 6.

On page 45553, second column, last paragraph, line 9, the figure “$472.60” is corrected to read “$472.59”. 7. On page 45554, top of the page, in the table titled “COMPARISON OF FACTORS AND ADJUSTMENTS. FY 2021 CAPITAL FEDERAL RATE AND THE FY 2022 CAPITAL FEDERAL RATE”, the list entry (row 5) is corrected to read as follows. Comparison of Factors and Adjustments.

FY 2021 Capital Federal Rate and the FY 2022 Capital Federal Rate FY 2021FY 2022ChangePercent change *         *         *         *         *         *         *Capital Federal Rate$466.21$472.591.01374  1.37 8. On page 45570. A. The table titled “TABLE 1A.—NATIONAL ADJUSTED OPERATING STANDARDIZED AMOUNTS, LABOR/NONLABOR (67.6 PERCENT LABOR SHARE/32.4 PERCENT NONLABOR SHARE IF WAGE INDEX IS GREATER THAN 1)—FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows. Table 1A—National Adjusted Operating Standardized Amounts, Labor/Nonlabor (67.6 Percent Labor Share/32.4 Percent Nonlabor Share if Wage Index Is Greater Than 1)—FY 2022Hospital submitted quality data and is a meaningful EHR user (update = 2.0 percent)Hospital submitted quality data and is not a meaningful EHR user (update = −0.025 percent)Hospital did not submit quality data and is a meaningful EHR user (update = 1.325 percent)Hospital did not submit quality data and is not a meaningful EHR user (update = −0.7 percent)LaborNonlaborLaborNonlaborLaborNonlaborLaborNonlabor$4,138.24$1,983.41$4,056.08$1,944.03$4,110.85$1,970.28$4,028.70$1,930.91 Start Printed Page 58027 b.

The table titled “TABLE 1B.—NATIONAL ADJUSTED OPERATING STANDARDIZED AMOUNTS, LABOR/NONLABOR (62 PERCENT LABOR SHARE/38 PERCENT NONLABOR SHARE IF WAGE INDEX IS LESS THAN OR EQUAL TO 1)—FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows. Table 1B—National Adjusted Operating Standardized Amounts, Labor/Nonlabor (62 Percent Labor Share/38 Percent Nonlabor Share if Wage Index is Less Than or Equal to 1)—FY 2022Hospital submitted quality data and is a meaningful EHR user (update = 2.0 percent)Hospital submitted quality data and is not a meaningful EHR user (update = −0.025 percent)Hospital did not submit quality data and is a meaningful EHR user (update = 1.325 percent)Hospital did not submit quality data and is not a meaningful EHR user (update = −0.7 percent)LaborNonlaborLaborNonlaborLaborNonlaborLaborNonlabor$3,795.42$2,326.23$3,720.07$2,280.04$3,770.30$2,310.83$3,694.96$2,264.65 9. On page 45571, the top of page. A. The table titled “Table 1C.—ADJUSTED OPERATING STANDARDIZED AMOUNTS FOR HOSPITALS IN PUERTO RICO, LABOR/NONLABOR (NATIONAL.

62 PERCENT LABOR SHARE/38 PERCENT NONLABOR SHARE BECAUSE WAGE INDEX IS LESS THAN OR EQUAL TO 1)—FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows. Table 1C—Adjusted Operating Standardized Amounts for Hospitals in Puerto Rico, Labor/Nonlabor (National. 62 Percent Labor Share/38 Percent Nonlabor Share Because Wage Index Is Less Than or Equal to 1)—FY 2022 Rates if wage index greater than 1Hospital is a meaningful EHR user and wage index less than or equal to 1 (update = 2.0)Hospital is NOT a meaningful EHR user and wage index less than or equal to 1 (update = 1.325)LaborNonlaborLaborNonlaborLaborNonlabor1  NationalNot ApplicableNot Applicable$3,795.42$2,326.23$3,770.30$2,310.831  For FY 2022, there are no CBSAs in Puerto Rico with a national wage index greater than 1. B. The table titled “TABLE 1D.—CAPITAL STANDARD FEDERAL PAYMENT RATE—FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows.

Table 1D—Capital Standard Federal Payment Rate—FY 2022 RateNational$472.59 C. Correction of Errors in the Appendices 1. On pages 45576 through 45578, the table titled “Table I.—Impact Analysis of Changes to the IPPS for Operating Costs for FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows. Start Printed Page 58028 Start Printed Page 58029 Start Printed Page 58030 2. On page 45579, third column, first paragraph, line 23, the figure “1.000712” is corrected to read “1.000715”.

Start Printed Page 58031 3. On page 45580, lower three-fourths of the page, first column, third full paragraph, line 6, the figure “0.986737” is corrected to read “0.986741”. 4. On pages 45582 and 45583, the table titled “Table II.—Impact Analysis of Changes for FY 2022 Acute Care Hospital Operating Prospective Payment System (Payments Per Discharge)” is corrected to read as follows. Table II—Impact Analysis of Changes for FY 2022 Acute Care Hospital Operating Prospective Payment System[Payments per discharge] Number of hospitalsEstimated average FY 2021 payment per dischargeEstimated average FY 2022 payment per dischargeFY 2022 changes (1)(2)(3)(4)All Hospitals3,19513,10913,4482.6By Geographic Location:Urban hospitals2,45913,45413,8002.6Rural hospitals7369,90110,1782.8Bed Size (Urban):0-99 beds63410,72311,0112.7100-199 beds75411,01511,3052.6200-299 beds42712,25112,5512.4300-499 beds42113,49613,8472.6500 or more beds22316,56816,9922.6Bed Size (Rural):0-49 beds3118,5568,9214.350-99 beds2539,4199,6442.4100-149 beds949,78910,0332.5150-199 beds3910,51910,7882.6200 or more beds3911,46511,7842.8Urban by Region:New England11214,85815,2532.7Middle Atlantic30415,43215,8142.5East North Central38112,83813,1502.4West North Central16013,12113,4752.7South Atlantic40211,71012,0492.9East South Central14411,29011,5762.5West South Central36411,80612,0722.3Mountain17213,69814,0542.6Pacific37017,23017,6642.5Puerto Rico508,4918,6371.7Rural by Region:New England1913,99014,4633.4Middle Atlantic509,7369,9882.6East North Central11310,36110,5922.2West North Central8910,63810,9322.8South Atlantic1149,0329,3023East South Central1448,7328,9552.6West South Central1358,2928,5403Mountain4812,13412,3591.9Pacific2413,86514,5885.2By Payment Classification:Urban hospitals1,98312,67313,0032.6Rural areas1,21213,79614,1482.6Teaching Status:Nonteaching2,03110,67710,9632.7Fewer than 100 residents90712,38812,6942.5100 or more residents25718,93819,4372.6Urban DSH:Non-DSH50211,74912,0542.6100 or more beds1,22713,01513,3552.6Less than 100 beds3489,5599,8202.7Rural DSH:SCH26511,90612,2032.5RRC60814,38014,7472.6100 or more beds3012,11512,2981.5Less than 100 beds2157,7788,0253.2Urban teaching and DSH:Both teaching and DSH67914,11614,4832.6Teaching and no DSH7412,82513,1272.4No teaching and DSH89610,85011,1372.6No teaching and no DSH33410,82411,1102.6Special Hospital Types:Start Printed Page 58032RRC52314,47814,8592.6SCH30512,05312,3562.5MDH1539,1699,4042.6SCH and RRC15412,47512,7462.2MDH and RRC2710,62210,8532.2Type of Ownership:Voluntary1,88113,32113,6672.6Proprietary82811,47311,7692.6Government48614,10914,4662.5Medicare Utilization as a Percent of Inpatient Days:0-2564315,15815,5352.525-502,11012,92613,2682.650-6536710,77311,0102.2Over 65508,1328,4313.7FY 2022 Reclassifications by the Medicare Geographic Classification Review Board:All Reclassified Hospitals93413,59213,9442.6Non-Reclassified Hospitals2,26112,77213,1022.6Urban Hospitals Reclassified74914,26114,6192.5Urban Nonreclassified Hospitals1,72312,85113,1872.6Rural Hospitals Reclassified Full Year30010,08710,3412.5Rural Nonreclassified Hospitals Full Year4239,6109,9293.3All Section 401 Reclassified Hospitals53214,96815,3432.5Other Reclassified Hospitals (Section 1886(d)(8)(B))569,1499,4293.1 5.

On page 45584, bottom third of the page, third column, partial paragraph. A. Line 7, the figure “$151 million” is corrected to read “$158 million”. B. Line 10, the figure “$50 million” is corrected to read “$57 million”.

C. Lines 15 and 16, the phrase “for which we are approving new technology add-on payments” is corrected to read “for which we are approving or conditionally approving new technology add-on payments”. 6. On page 45585. A.

Top third of the page. (1) In the untitled table, the third and fourth column headings and the entries at rows 6 and 9 are corrected to read as follows. Technology nameEstimated casesFY 2022 NTAP amountEstimated FY 2022 total impactPathway (QIDP, LPAD, or breakthrough device) *         *         *         *         *         *         *Fetroja (HABP/VABP)379$8,579.84$3,251,759.36QIDP. *         *         *         *         *         *         *Recarbrio (HABP/VABP)9289,576.518,887,001.28QIDP. *         *         *         *         *         *         * (2) Following the first untitled table, second column, partial paragraph, last line, the figure “$498 million” is corrected to read “$514 million”. B. Middle third of the page, in the untitled table, the third and fourth column headings and the entries at rows 2 and 4 are corrected to read as follows.

Technology nameEstimated casesFY 2022 NTAP amountEstimated FY 2022 total impact *         *         *         *         *         *         *Abecma484$272,675.00$131,974,700.00 Start Printed Page 58033*         *         *         *         *         *         *Tecartus15259,350.003,890,250.00 *         *         *         *         *         *         * 7. On pages 45587 and 45588, the table titled “Modeled Uncompensated Care Payments for Estimated FY 2022 DSHs by Hospital Type. Model Uncompensated Care Payments ($ in Millions)—from FY 2021 to FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows. Start Printed Page 58034 Start Printed Page 58035 8. On page 45588, lower half of the page, beginning with the second column, first full paragraph, line 1 with the phrase “Rural hospitals, in general, are projected to experience” and ending in the third column last paragraph with the phrase “15.22 percent.

All” the paragraphs are corrected to read as follows. €œRural hospitals, in general, are projected to experience larger decreases in uncompensated care payments than their urban counterparts. Overall, rural hospitals are projected to receive a 17.28 percent decrease in uncompensated care payments, which is a greater decrease than the overall hospital average, while urban hospitals are projected to receive a 12.99 percent decrease in uncompensated care payments, similar to the overall hospital average. By bed size, smaller rural hospitals are projected to receive the largest decreases in uncompensated care payments. Rural hospitals with 0-99 beds are projected to receive an 18.97 percent payment decrease, and rural hospitals with 100-249 beds are projected to receive a 15.53 percent decrease.

In contrast, larger rural hospitals with 250+ beds are projected to receive a 14.16 percent payment decrease. Among urban hospitals, the smallest urban hospitals, those with 0-99 and 100-249 beds, are projected to receive a decrease in uncompensated care payments that is greater than the overall hospital average, at 15.49 and 15.50 percent, respectively. In contrast, the largest urban hospitals with 250+ beds are projected to receive a 12.02 percent decrease in uncompensated care payments, which is a smaller decrease than the overall hospital average. By region, rural hospitals are expected to receive larger than average decreases in uncompensated care payments in all Regions, except for rural hospitals in New England, which are projected to receive a decrease of 1.27 percent in uncompensated care payments, and rural hospitals in the East South Central Region, which are projected to receive a smaller than average decrease of 13.01 percent. Regionally, urban hospitals are projected to receive a more varied range of payment changes.

Urban hospitals in the New England, Middle Atlantic, and Pacific Regions are projected to receive larger than average decreases in uncompensated care payments. Urban hospitals in the South Atlantic, East North Central, West North Central, West South Central, and Mountain Regions, as well as hospitals in Puerto Rico are projected to receive smaller than average decreases in uncompensated care payments. Urban hospitals in the East South Central Region are projected to receive an average decrease in uncompensated care payments. By payment classification, although hospitals in urban areas overall are expected to receive a 12.74 percent decrease in uncompensated care payments, hospitals in large urban areas are expected to see a decrease in uncompensated care payments of 13.52 percent, while hospitals in other urban areas are expected to receive a decrease in uncompensated care payments of 11.21 percent. Rural hospitals are projected to receive the largest decrease of 14.23 percent.

Nonteaching hospitals are projected to receive a payment decrease of 13.4 percent, teaching hospitals with fewer than 100 residents are projected to receive a payment decrease of 12.94 percent, and teaching hospitals with 100+ residents have a projected payment decrease of 13.39 percent. All of these decreases closely approximate the overall hospital average. Proprietary and voluntary hospitals are projected to receive smaller than average decreases of 11.56 and 12.61 percent respectively, while government hospitals are expected to receive a larger payment decrease of 15.21 percent. All”. 9.

On page 45589, first column, first partial paragraph, the phrase “hospitals with less than 50 percent Medicare utilization are projected to receive decreases in uncompensated care payments consistent with the overall hospital average percent change, while hospitals with 50-65 percent and greater than 65 percent Medicare utilization are projected to receive larger decreases of 20.79 and 32.81 percent, respectively.” is corrected to read as follows. €œhospitals with less than 50 percent Medicare utilization are projected to receive decreases in uncompensated care payments consistent with the overall hospital average percent change, while hospitals with 50-65 percent and greater than 65 percent Medicare utilization are projected to receive larger decreases of 20.85 and 32.86 percent, respectively.” Start Printed Page 58036 10. On page 45598, third column, last paragraph, lines 21 through 23, the sentence “The estimated percentage increase for both rural reclassified and nonreclassified hospitals is 1.4 percent.” is corrected to read “The estimated percentage increase for rural reclassified hospitals is 1.3 percent, while the estimated percentage increase for rural nonreclassified hospitals is 1.4 percent.” 11. On pages 45599 and 45600, the table titled “TABLE III.—COMPARISON OF TOTAL PAYMENTS PER CASE [FY 2021 PAYMENTS COMPARED TO FY 2022 PAYMENTS]” is corrected to read as follows. Start Printed Page 58037 Start Printed Page 58038 12.

On page 45610. A. Second column, first partial paragraph. (1) Line 1, the figure “$2.293” is corrected to read “$2.316”. (2) Line 11, the figure “$0.65” is corrected to read “$0.68”.

B. Third column, last full paragraph, last line, the figure “$2.293” is corrected to read “$2.316”. 13. On page 45611, the table titled “Table V—ACCOUNTING STATEMENT. CLASSIFICATION OF ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES UNDER THE IPPS FROM FY 2021 TO FY 2022” is corrected to read as follows.

Start Printed Page 58039 CategoryTransfersAnnualized Monetized Transfers$2.316 billion.From Whom to WhomFederal Government to IPPS Medicare Providers. Start List of Subjects DiseasesHealth facilitiesMedicarePuerto RicoReporting and recordkeeping requirements End List of Subjects As noted in section II.B. Of the preamble, the Centers for Medicare &. Medicaid Services is making the following correcting amendments to 42 CFR part 413. Start Part End Part Start Amendment Part1.

The authority citation for part 413 continues to read as follows. End Amendment Part Start Authority 42 U.S.C. 1302, 1395d(d), 1395f(b), 1395g, 1395l(a), (i), and (n), 1395x(v), 1395hh, 1395rr, 1395tt, and 1395ww. End Authority Start Amendment Part2. Amend § 413.24 by.

End Amendment Part Start Amendment Parta. In paragraph (f)(5)(i) introductory text, removing the phrase “except as provided in paragraph (f)(5)(i)(E) of this section:” and adding in its place the phrase “except as provided in paragraphs (f)(5)(i)(A)( 2 )( ii ) and (f)(5)(i)(E) of this section:”. And End Amendment Part Start Amendment Partb. Revising paragraph (f)(5)(i)(A). End Amendment Part The revision reads as follows.

Adequate cost data and cost finding. * * * * * (f) * * * (5) * * * (i) * * * (A) Teaching hospitals. For teaching hospitals, the Intern and Resident Information System (IRIS) data. ( 1 ) Data format. For cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2021, the IRIS data must be in the new XML IRIS format.

( 2 ) Resident counts. ( i ) Effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2021, the IRIS data must contain the same total counts of direct GME FTE residents (unweighted and weighted) and IME FTE residents as the total counts of direct GME FTE and IME FTE residents reported in the provider's cost report. ( ii ) For cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2021, and before October 1, 2022, the cost report is not rejected if the requirement in paragraph (f)(5)(i)(A)( 2 )( i ) of this section is not met. * * * * * Start Signature Karuna Seshasai, Executive Secretary to the Department, Department of Health and Human Services. End Signature End Supplemental Information BILLING CODE 4120-01-PBILLING CODE 4120-01-CBILLING CODE 4120-01-PBILLING CODE 4120-01-CBILLING CODE 4120-01-PBILLING CODE 4120-01-CBILLING CODE 4120-01-P[FR Doc.

2021-22724 Filed 10-19-21. 8:45 am]BILLING CODE 4120-01-C.